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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 9:01 pm 
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January 20, 1861 Sunday
Forces of Mississippi took Fort Massachusetts and the other installations on Ship Island in the Gulf off Mississippi. Two other groups had visited the island and demanded its surrender, but they had left. This time Ship Island, potentially important as a staging and supply point, was finally taken over by the secessionist.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 11:31 pm 
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January 21, 1861 Monday
In a dramatic and moving scene in the United States Senate, five senators from Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi left the chamber. Their farewell speeches showed reluctance, determination, sorrow, and disappointment. David L. Yulee indicated his path lay with his state of Florida; Stephen R. Mallory of Florida tearfully called for reason and justice over party and passion; Clement C. Clay, Jr., of Alabama, pointed to the years of trial that had led to the present crisis; Benjamin Fitzpatrick of Alabama acknowledged his loyalty to his sovereign state. Then rose Jefferson Davis of Mississippi. Because of the secession of his state “my functions are terminated here.” “I concur in the action of the people of Mississippi, believing it to be necessary and proper, and should have been bound by their action if my belief had been otherwise … I am sure I feel no hostility to you, Senators from the North. I am sure there is not one of you, whatever sharp discussion there may have been between us, to whom I cannot now say, in the presence of my God, I wish you well; … Mr. President, and Senators, having made the announcement which the occasion seemed to me to require, it only remains for me to bid you a final adieu.” Ill, having passed a sleepless night, Davis gravely gave his farewell to the Senate he had served so well. Unshed tears were in his voice, which at first faltered. He was listened to in deep silence, broken by some applause, which Davis depreciated. “Inexpressibly sad he left the chamber, with but faint hope,” his wife wrote. That night she heard him pray for peace.

Georgia, Alabama, and Florida members of the House of Representatives also withdrew from the U.S. Congress.

Rumors continued to fly everywhere; this time the Brooklyn Navy Yard was to be attacked. In Boston abolitionist Wendell Phillips addressed the Congregational Society, said he was a disunion man, was glad that the Southern states were leaving, and that he hoped all the slave states would leave and soon. The New York legislature in a series of resolutions pledged to support the Union.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2011 12:35 am 
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January 22, 1861 Tuesday
Wisconsin’s legislature supported the New York pro-Union moves, as did other states.

New York authorities seized guns and ammunition in private warehouses intended for Georgia. Marine Guard at Brooklyn Navy Yard were put under arms as a precaution against difficulty with Confederate sympathizers.

Kentucky House, by a vote of 87 to 6, resolves to resist the invasion of the South at all hazards.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 2:18 am 
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January 23, 1861 Wednesday
Massachusetts voted its approbation of the Federal Union, following the New York stand.

President-elect Lincoln waits in vain at the Springfield station for arrival of Mrs. Lincoln and their eldest son Robert on night train from east.

Except for Joshua Hill, all of Georgia’s members of the U.S. House of Representatives signed a letter to the Speaker of the House announcing that they were no longer members of that body, since Georgia had withdrawn from the Union and had repealed the 1788 ordinance ratifying the U.S. Constitution. Hill withdrew by sending the Speaker a letter of resignation on the grounds that Georgians no longer wished to be represented in Congress. Because Georgia’s senators had resigned earlier, this left the state without any representation in Congress.

Gov. Joseph E. Brown of Georgia demanded that U.S. Army Capt. Arnold Elzey, commander of the federal arsenal at Augusta, surrender the facility to the state of Georgia. Elzey, who had a small force of 80 soldiers, refused Brown’s demand. Rumors that Georgia was going to take the arsenal by force led 800 Augustans to volunteer for military duty. Gov. Brown, however, decided to give Elzey a chance to reconsider. Elzey telegraphed Army officials in Washington D.C. of his situation and asked for further instructions.

Commander John A. Dahlgren noted that as a precaution against an attack on the Washington Navy Yard, he had the cannon and the ammunition from the Yard magazine removed to the attic of the main building.

Louisiana Convention meets, receiving Commissioners from South Carolina and Alabama.

Florida state garrisons at St. Augustine remove lenses from the St. Augustine and Jupiter Inlet lighthouses forcing them to shut down.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2011 1:32 am 
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January 24, 1861 Thursday
700 Georgia state troops took over the U.S. Arsenal at Augusta, complete with its supply of arms. The Arsenal contained two 12-pound howitzers, two cannons, 22,000 muskets and rifles, and large stores of powder, cannon balls, grape shot, etc.

From Fort Monroe, Va., Federal reinforcements sailed for Fort Pickens, Fla.

The Pennsylvania legislature pledged its support of the Union. The North Carolina legislature voted to hold a state convention, but submitted the question to the people.

In Springfield, President-elect Lincoln again waits in vain at station for arrival of Mrs. Lincoln and Robert.

Lucy, a female slave from Wheeling, Va., who fled to Cleveland, Ohio, is returned to her owner. She is the last slave to be returned under the Fugitive Slave Law.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:09 am 
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January 25, 1861 Friday
In Kentucky the legislature urged a national convention.

Lincoln is delighted by return of Mrs. Lincoln and Robert from East; he has been expecting them for three days.

Captain Samuel F. Du Pont wrote Commander Andrew Hull Foote about the number of naval officers resigning their commissions to go to their home States in the South: "What made me most sick at heart, is the resignations from the Navy . . . I [have been] nurtured, fed and clothed by the general government for over forty years, paid whether employed or not, and for what--why to stand by the country, whether assailed by enemies from without or foes within--my oath declared 'allegiance to the United States' as well as to support the Constitution . . . I stick by the flag and the national government as long as we have one, whether my state does or not and she knows it."

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:28 pm 
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January 26, 1861 Saturday
Louisiana Is Sixth State To Secede

There had been considerable change of feeling in Louisiana after the election of Lincoln and the secession of other Southern states. Now, at Baton Rouge, the Louisiana State Convention voted for an ordinance of secession 113 to 17. The sixth state had left the Union and it was probable Texas would follow. At the moment that appeared to be the limit to secession, at least until further developments brought a change. New Orleans business was almost at a standstill and the talk of war increased as forts and arsenals in the state were seized. The ordinance of secession was signed with gold pens given each member, and there was the usual approval in the streets. Still, New Orleans and the coast had traded extensively with the North and it had taken radical shifts in opinion to bring the state to this decision.

At Savannah, Ga., the Oglethorpe Barracks and Fort Jackson were appropriated by state troops.

The sovereign state of Mississippi establishes a state flag: It featured a white, five-pointed star on a dark blue canton (commonly called the Bonnie Blue), a field of white with a magnolia tree and a red banner on the fly end.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 26, 2011 7:35 pm 
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January 27, 1861 Sunday
Lincoln publicly designates February 11, 1861 as day of departure for Washington. He also makes known desire for "the utmost privacy" during remainder of stay in Springfield. He plans to "go via Lafayette to Indianapolis, where he will receive the hospitalities of Indiana Legislature; thence he will proceed, probably by way of Cincinnati to Columbus, Cleveland, Buffalo, and Albany. From Albany he intends to make for Harrisburg direct, thence to Baltimore and Washington; but a tour to New York and Philadelphia is not impossible."

Kentucky Legislature adopts the Virginia resolutions requiring the Federal government to protect slavery in the Territories and to guarantee the right of transit of slaves through the Free States.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:27 pm 
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January 28, 1861 Monday
President-elect Lincoln was preparing his inaugural address and making plans to leave Springfield, Ill. The first draft of the inaugural message will not be finished until after consultation with the Republican leaders in Washington. . . . No further invitations will be issued to prominent politicians to visit the President-elect, and none are desired here. The Cabinet will be completed in Washington.

Louisiana state troops took possession of Fort Macomb, not far from New Orleans.

Former U. S. Senator David Levy Yulee of Fla. informed Stephen Mallory that the Federal warship, U.S.S. Brooklyn, was bound for Fort Pickens with two companies of soldier aboard. Mallory immediately informed friends in the Union capital that Confederate forces would not attack as long as conditions did not change. When this information was passed along to outgoing President James Buchanan, he ordered the troops be kept aboard the ship and not landed.

For many southerners, the election of Abraham Lincoln in the fall of 1860 was equivalent to a declaration of war on the South. A few, including Texas' aging Governor Sam Houston, argued against secession. They proclaimed the benefits of mediation and compromise. Further, if Texas did separate from the Union, Houston reasoned, she would fare better as an independent republic than as a member of the Confederacy. Houston's views, however, carried little weight among the secessionists in the state, who were clearly in the majority. But by refusing to call the legislature into session, the increasingly unpopular Houston temporarily blocked his opponents from any official action. The secessionists countered Houston's maneuver by calling on the people of Texas to elect delegates to a Session Convention to meet in Austin. Their purpose was to consider what action Texas should take on the secession issue in light of the recent sequence of events. As a result, a total of 177 delegates were elected, representing two members from almost every county. The convention met on January 28, 1861.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:47 pm 
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January 29, 1861 Tuesday
Kansas was admitted to the Union by Congress as the thirty-fourth state. The Wyandotte Constitution prohibited slavery and the state was largely Union in sentiment.

In New Orleans the U.S. Revenue Cutter Robert McClelland was surrendered to state authorities despite orders from Washington to defend the vessel and the flag.

After previously ordering the Brooklyn to go to Fort Pickens with supplies and troops to reinforce Lieutenant Slemmer's command on January 21, the Buchanan administration now ordered the Brooklyn to land supplies, but leave the troop reinforcements on board. The troops were to remain at sea unless the fort was attacked or appeared in imminent danger of attack. Slemmer was instructed to act "strictly on the defensive, and avoid as far as possible a collision with the hostile troops concentrated at Pensacola and in the adjacent forts." In return, the Buchanan administration received "satisfactory assurances" that the fort would not be attacked by secessionist forces.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 10:53 pm 
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January 30, 1861 Wednesday
At Mobile the U.S. Revenue Cutter Lewis Cass was surrendered to Alabama officers.

In the morning, President-Elect Lincoln departs Springfield on the Great Western Railroad. He is traveling to visit his stepmother Sarah Bush Lincoln, "who resides near Charleston, in Coles county." A newspaper reports that Lincoln "expects to return" to Springfield on the evening of February 1. Arrives Charleston on freight train shortly after 6 P.M., having changed trains at Mattoon. In the evening, Lincoln spends the night at home of Illinois State Senator Thomas A. Marshall. Many friends visit with Lincoln during his stay.

Louisiana Secessionist Convention selects 6 delegates to represent the state at the Convention of Seceded States in Montgomery, AL.

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2011 9:53 pm 
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January 31, 1861 Thursday
As the first month of 1861 ended, and with the crisis immensely aggravated since the secession of South Carolina in December, seizures of Federal property in the deep South continued. The U.S. Branch Mint and Customs House at New Orleans were taken, as was the U.S. Revenue Schooner Washington.

Lincoln rides to stepmother's home, where he spends day. "While there he paid a visit to the grave of his father. In the evening he rode back to town, in company with his aged relative, and at the urgent request of the citizens of the place held an impromptu reception at one of the public halls." Though called upon, Lincoln declines to speak. He stated that the time for a public definition of the policy of his administration had not come, and that he could but express his gratification at seeing so many of his friends and give them a hearty greeting.

The Atlanta city council called a meeting to consider sending delegates to a Feb. 4 meeting in Montgomery, Ala. to set up a government for the six states that had seceded from the Union. The city council appointed five delegates and instructed them "to use all honorable means to secure the location of the Confederate Capital in Atlanta."

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 4:46 pm 
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February 1, 1861 Friday
Texas Convention Votes For Secession

The Convention of the State of Texas voted 166 to 7 in favor of secession. Assembling in Austin Jan. 28, the convention expressed perhaps only part of the opinion of citizens of that sparsely settled state, but it provided, in accordance with the legislature requirements, for an election by the people and set it for Feb. 23. In actual fact the seventh and last of the first group of states to secede had left the Union. Now it would take something further to bring about a decision in the eight other slave states.

The Texans who voted to leave the Union did so over the objections of their governor, Sam Houston. The hero of the Texas War for Independence was in his third term as the state's chief executive; a staunch Unionist, his election seemed to indicate that Texas did not share the rising secessionist sentiments of the other southern states.

But events in the year following Houston's election swayed many Texans to the secessionist cause. John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry, Virginia, in October 1859 raised the specter of a massive slave insurrection, and the ascendant Republican Party made many Texans uneasy about continuing in the Union. After Abraham Lincoln's election to the presidency, pressure mounted on Houston to call a convention so that Texas could consider secession. He did so reluctantly in January, and he sat in silence on February 1 as the convention voted overwhelmingly in favor of secession. Houston grumbled that Texans were "stilling the voice of reason," and he predicted an "ignoble defeat" for the South.

President-elect Lincoln privately wrote William H. Seward, “I say now, however, as I have all the while said, that on the territorial question – that is, the question of extending slavery under the national auspices, - I am inflexible.” He opposed any compromise “which assists or permits the extension of the institution on soil owned by the nation.”

President Buchanan appointed Horatio King of Maine as Postmaster General to succeed Joseph Holt, who had become Secretary of War.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:48 pm 
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February 2, 1861 Saturday
President-elect Lincoln wrote that he already had his inaugural address “blocked out” but was holding it subject to revision.

Kentucky Senate passes, by a vote of 25 to 11, resolutions appealing to the Southern States to stop the revolution, protesting against Federal coercion, and providing that the legislature reassemble on April 24th to hear the responses from sister States. The Senate also favors making an application to call a national Convention for proposing amendments to the Constitution of the United States. And the Senate, by a vote of 25 to 14, declares it expedient at this time to call a State Convention.

Governor Madison Starke Perry addressed a request to the Florida Legislature to reorganize and strengthen the Florida militia in order to protect the state against a possible Union attack.

Texas adopts a Declaration of Causes:

The government of the United States, by certain joint resolutions, bearing date the 1st day of March, in the year A.D. 1845, proposed to the Republic of Texas, then a free, sovereign and independent nation, the annexation of the latter to the former as one of the co-equal States thereof,

The people of Texas, by deputies in convention assembled, on the fourth day of July of the same year, assented to and accepted said proposals and formed a constitution for the proposed State, upon which on the 29th day of December in the same year, said State was formally admitted into the Confederated Union.

Texas abandoned her separate national existence and consented to become one of the Confederated States to promote her welfare, insure domestic tranquility [sic] and secure more substantially the blessings of peace and liberty to her people. She was received into the confederacy with her own constitution, under the guarantee of the federal constitution and the compact of annexation, that she should enjoy these blessings. She was received as a commonwealth holding, maintaining and protecting the institution known as negro slavery--the servitude of the African to the white race within her limits--a relation that had existed from the first settlement of her wilderness by the white race, and which her people intended should exist in all future time. Her institutions and geographical position established the strongest ties between her and other slave-holding States of the confederacy. Those ties have been strengthened by association. But what has been the course of the government of the United States, and of the people and authorities of the non-slave-holding States, since our connection with them?

The controlling majority of the Federal Government, under various pretences and disguises, has so administered the same as to exclude the citizens of the Southern States, unless under odious and unconstitutional restrictions, from all the immense territory owned in common by all the States on the Pacific Ocean, for the avowed purpose of acquiring sufficient power in the common government to use it as a means of destroying the institutions of Texas and her sister slave-holding States.

By the disloyalty of the Northern States and their citizens and the imbecility of the Federal Government, infamous combinations of incendiaries and outlaws have been permitted in those States and the common territory of Kansas to trample upon the federal laws, to war upon the lives and property of Southern citizens in that territory, and finally, by violence and mob law, to usurp the possession of the same as exclusively the property of the Northern States.

The Federal Government, while but partially under the control of these our unnatural and sectional enemies, has for years almost entirely failed to protect the lives and property of the people of Texas against the Indian savages on our border, and more recently against the murderous forays of banditti from the neighboring territory of Mexico; and when our State government has expended large amounts for such purpose, the Federal Government has refused reimbursement therefor, thus rendering our condition more insecure and harrassing than it was during the existence of the Republic of Texas.

These and other wrongs we have patiently borne in the vain hope that a returning sense of justice and humanity would induce a different course of administration.

When we advert to the course of individual non-slave-holding States, and that [of] a majority of their citizens, our grievances assume far greater magnitude.

The States of Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Iowa, by solemn legislative enactments, have deliberately, directly or indirectly violated the 3rd clause of the 2nd section of the 4th article of the federal constitution, and laws passed in pursuance thereof; thereby annulling a material provision of the compact, designed by its framers to perpetuate amity between the members of the confederacy and to secure the rights of the slave-holdings States in their domestic institutions--a provision founded in justice and wisdom, and without the enforcement of which the compact fails to accomplish the object of its creation. Some of those States have imposed high fines and degrading penalties upon any of their citizens or officers who may carry out in good faith that provision of the compact, or the federal laws enacted in accordance therewith.

In all the non-slave-holding States, in violation of that good faith and comity which should exist between entirely distinct nations, the people have formed themselves into a great sectional party, now strong enough in numbers to control the affairs of each of those States, based upon the unnatural feeling of hostility to these Southern States and their beneficent and patriarchal system of African slavery, proclaiming the debasing doctrine of the equality of all men, irrespective of race or color--a doctrine at war with nature, in opposition to the experience of mankind, and in violation of the plainest revelations of the Divine Law. They demand the abolition of negro slavery throughout the confederacy, the recognition of political equality between the white and the negro races, and avow their determination to press on their crusade against us, so long as a negro slave remains in these States.

For years past this abolition organization has been actively sowing the seeds of discord through the Union, and has rendered the federal congress the arena for spreading firebrands and hatred between the slave-holding and non-slave-holding States.

By consolidating their strength, they have placed the slave-holding States in a hopeless minority in the federal congress, and rendered representation of no avail in protecting Southern rights against their exactions and encroachments.

They have proclaimed, and at the ballot box sustained, the revolutionary doctrine that there is a "higher law" than the constitution and laws of our Federal Union, and virtually that they will disregard their oaths and trample upon our rights.

They have for years past encouraged and sustained lawless organizations to steal our slaves and prevent their recapture, and have repeatedly murdered Southern citizens while lawfully seeking their rendition.
They have invaded Southern soil and murdered unoffending citizens, and through the press their leading men and a fanatical pulpit have bestowed praise upon the actors and assassins in these crimes, while the governors of several of their States have refused to deliver parties implicated and indicted for participation in such offences, upon the legal demands of the States aggrieved.

They have, through the mails and hired emissaries, sent seditious pamphlets and papers among us to stir up servile insurrection and bring blood and carnage to our firesides.

They have sent hired emissaries among us to burn our towns and distribute arms and poison to our slaves for the same purpose.

They have impoverished the slave-holding States by unequal and partial legislation, thereby enriching themselves by draining our substance.

They have refused to vote appropriations for protecting Texas against ruthless savages, for the sole reason that she is a slave-holding State.

And, finally, by the combined sectional vote of the seventeen non-slave-holding States, they have elected as president and vice-president of the whole confederacy two men whose chief claims to such high positions are their approval of these long continued wrongs, and their pledges to continue them to the final consummation of these schemes for the ruin of the slave-holding States.

In view of these and many other facts, it is meet that our own views should be distinctly proclaimed.
We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.

That in this free government all white men are and of right ought to be entitled to equal civil and political rights; that the servitude of the African race, as existing in these States, is mutually beneficial to both bond and free, and is abundantly authorized and justified by the experience of mankind, and the revealed will of the Almighty Creator, as recognized by all Christian nations; while the destruction of the existing relations between the two races, as advocated by our sectional enemies, would bring inevitable calamities upon both and desolation upon the fifteen slave-holding States.

By the secession of six of the slave-holding States, and the certainty that others will speedily do likewise, Texas has no alternative but to remain in an isolated connection with the North, or unite her destinies with the South.

For these and other reasons, solemnly asserting that the federal constitution has been violated and virtually abrogated by the several States named, seeing that the federal government is now passing under the control of our enemies to be diverted from the exalted objects of its creation to those of oppression and wrong, and realizing that our own State can no longer look for protection, but to God and her own sons--We the delegates of the people of Texas, in Convention assembled, have passed an ordinance dissolving all political connection with the government of the United States of America and the people thereof and confidently appeal to the intelligence and patriotism of the freemen of Texas to ratify the same at the ballot box, on the 23rd day of the present month.

Adopted in Convention on the 2nd day of Feby, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one and of the independence of Texas the twenty-fifth.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2011 12:32 am 
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February 3, 1861 Sunday
Louisiana Senators Judeh P. Benjamin and John Slidell resign from the U.S. Senate.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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