ACWGC
* ACWGC     * Dpt. of Records       * CSA HQ    * VMI    * Join CSA    
   * Union HQ    * UMA    * Join Union     ACWGC Memorial
CSA Armies:    ANV    AotW
Union Armies:    AotT     AotC      AotP      AotS     Union Army Forums
     Link Express
American Civil War Books, Magazines and Games for sale (See other items)
Club Forums:     NWC    CCC     Home Pages:     NWC    CCC    ACWGC
It is currently Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:48 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 384 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 26  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 4, 1861 Monday
Convention of Seceded States Meets In Montgomery, Alabama

“Be it remembered that on the fourth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and in the Capitol of the State of Alabama, in the city of Montgomery, at the hour of noon, there assembled certain deputies and delegates from the several independent Southern States of North America, to wit: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina; …” Thus read the official record of the convention of the seceded states that was to become the first session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America. The thirty-seven delegates named Howell Cobb of Georgia President of the Convention. He told the assemblage: “The separation is perfect, complete, and perpetual. The great duty is now imposed upon us of providing for these States a government for their future security and protection.” And they got to work rapidly with a minimum of debate and dissension. Originating in a recommendation by South Carolina, this convention of delegates from six seceding states gathered. Texas, which awaited its referendum, was not involved in the early deliberations.

The delegates to the Montgomery convention were largely chosen by the state conventions. They were a distinguished group of southern leaders, and a surprising number were moderates. Prominent fire-eaters, as ardent secessionists were called, were often passed over in favor of more moderate men. Not surprisingly, therefore, they chose the United States Constitution as their model, and retained its basic features. There were significant changes, however, such as references to state sovereignty, slavery, and God. The Confederate constitution also provided for an item veto of appropriations, a single six-year term for the President, and for the seating of cabinet members in Congress for discussions of department matters. It expressly protected slavery in the Confederacy and its territories, but much to the dissatisfaction of radicals, it prohibited the international slave trade. Ironically, the Confederate constitution implied, but did not assert, the principle of peaceable secession. It spoke about sovereign and independent states, but also referred to a permanent federal government.

In Washington the electoral vote for President as approved by Congress read: Abraham Lincoln 180, John C. Breckinridge 72, John Bell 39, and Stephen A. Douglas 12.

As the secessionists met at Montgomery, so in Washington the Peace Convention called by Virginia convened. There were eventually 131 members representing 21 states. None of the seceded states were represented and many of the delegates were elderly, but among them were many national leaders including former President John Tyler, who presided. At least it was a try and there was much debate by this honest, sincere, generally middle-of-the-road gathering. Its purpose was to avert war by finding a compromise that would permit the restoration of the Union. The Crittenden plan was, from the start, the basis for discussion. Arkansas, California, Oregon, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota did not send representatives.

Elections in Virginia create a pro-Union secessionist convention.

The Bascom Affair at Apache Pass in New Mexico occurred during this period which had far reaching effects on the war in the Southwest involving Indians during the American Civil War. A good account of it at http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/ci ... ascom.aspx

President-elect Lincoln in Springfield accepts invitation of New York Legislature to pass through state en route to Washington.

Jefferson Davis was commissioned a Major General of Mississippi troops.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 5, 1861 Tuesday
The Buchanan administration announced to the South Carolina commissioner that under no circumstances would Fort Sumter be surrendered. In the President’s eyes this ended the unofficial truce at Charleston set up January 13.

Two conventions were meeting. At Washington John Tyler told the Peace Convention that “the eyes of the whole country are turned to this assembly, in expectation and hope.” He called for a triumph of patriotism over party and for rescuing the nation.

In Montgomery Alexander Stephens of Georgia presented the rules of the convention of the seceded states and they were adopted. Christopher Memminger of South Carolina presented a resolution calling for formation of “a Confederacy of the States which have seceded from the Federal Union.” A committee was named to report a plan for a provisional government.

The 1861 United States Senate election in New York was held on February 5, 1861, by the New York State Legislature to elect a U.S. Senator (Class 3) to represent the State of New York in the United States Senate. Whig William H. Seward had been re-elected in February 1855 to this seat, had become a Republican upon the foundation of that party in September 1855, and his term would expire on March 3, 1861. Seward did not seek re-election, instead being certain to be appointed to an office in the incoming Abraham Lincoln administration. At the State election in November 1859, 23 Republicans and 9 Democrats were elected for a two-year term (1860-1861) in the State Senate. At the State election in November 1860, 93 Republicans and 35 Democrats were elected to the Assembly for the session of 1861. The 84th State Legislature met from January 1 to April 16, 1861, at Albany, New York. Ira Harris was the candidate of the Republican Party. Harris had been a Whig assemblyman in 1845 and 1846, and a justice of the New York Supreme Court from 1847 to 1859. Ex-Governor Horatio Seymour (in office 1853-1854) was the candidate of the Democratic Party. Ira Harris was the choice of both the Assembly and the Senate, and was declared elected. Harris served one term, and remained in office until March 3, 1867.

On February 5th, the sloop of war, U.S.S. Brooklyn, arrived at Pensacola, Florida, with troops, munitions, and provisions on board. Waiting for her were U.S. Navy warships—Sabine, Macedonian, Wyandotte, and St. Louis—called to the Gulf of Mexico from distant stations. Between the time the Brooklyn went to sea and its arrival at Pensacola, President Buchanan had rejected South Carolina Attorney General Hayne’s effort to negotiate the purchase of Fort Sumter from the government, and he had received ex-President John Tyler of Virginia, who arrived in late January with a request from the State of Virginia that Buchanan maintain the status quo, pending Virginia’s effort to convene a “Peace Convention” in Washington, to be attended by delegates from all the States; a last ditch effort to achieve a political resolution of the crisis caused by secession.

In consequence of his communications with Tyler, President Buchanan agreed to a truce at Pensacola which his secretaries of war and navy jointed communicated to Captain Vodges, commander of the troops on board the Brooklyn.

Sir: In consequence of assurances received, that Fort Pickens will not be attacked, you are instructed not to land the company on board the Brooklyn, unless you see preparations being made for an attack. The provisions necessary for the supply of the fort you will land.

J. Holt, Secretary of War
Isaac Toucey, Secretary of the Navy

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2011 10:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 6, 1861 Wednesday
The Lincolns (assisted by four of her sisters) held a farewell reception at their home in Springfield, Ill., with a large attendance, including politicians from many sections who had been flocking to the Illinois capital. "The levee lasted from seven to twelve o'clock in the evening, and the house thronged by thousands up to a late hour. Mr. Lincoln received the guests as they entered and were made known. They then passed on, and were introduced to Mrs. Lincoln, who stood near the center of the parlors, and who . . . acquitted herself most gracefully and admirably." Another reporter writes, "Behind [Lincoln] on the sofa were his two little boys, about eight and four years of age respectively, the youngest of whom was as noisy as a cub wolf. After a considerable time, the noise of the little urchin attracted the father's attention. Thereupon, turning about, and stooping down . . . he had some of the pleasantest words for the little fellow, that can be imagined. Thereafter there was no noise while I remained. Mrs. Lincoln, who is a squatty, pleasant little woman, receives her visitors with an easy gracefulness that makes all feel comfortable." Lincoln accepts invitation of New Jersey Legislature to visit state capital on journey to Washington. Accepts invitation of citizens of Albany, N.Y., to visit their city en route to inauguration.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 8:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 7, 1861 Thursday
The Choctaw Indian Nation declared its adherence to the Southern states.

While in Montgomery the Committee of Twelve, headed by Christopher Memminger, named to frame a provisional government, reported to the convention of seceded states. The convention, in secret session, immediately took up a discussion of the report.

Lincoln invites Orville H. Browning, attorney who later succeeds Stephen A. Douglas in U.S. Senate, to accompany him to Washington. Browning agrees to go as far as Indianapolis. Lincoln declines invitation from people of Massachusetts to visit state for "want of time." Accepts invitation to visit Columbus, Ohio. Acknowledges invitation from citizens of Dayton, Ohio: "I will endeavor to pass through and at least bow to the friends there."

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 6:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 8, 1861 Friday
Confederate Constitution Adopted

Late in the evening in the Alabama Capitol at Montgomery the convention of seceded states unanimously adopted the Provisional Constitution of the Confederate States. The Constitution was mainly based on that of the United States with a few significant differences, and a few changes that political scientists then and since have discussed. The primary change was that the right to own slaves was spelled out more completely than in the U.S. Constitution. Each state was acting “in its sovereign and independent character,” although no right of secession was stated, just implied. In a modification of the British system, Cabinet officers were to have seats on the floors of both houses in order to discuss measures; duties or taxes on imports to promote or foster industry were prohibited; importation of slaves was prohibited; the President could approve a portion of an appropriation bill or disapprove an appropriation in the same bill, which prevented riders tacked on to legislation; terms of President and Vice-President were six years and the President was not eligible for reelection. The fugitive slave clause of the United States was slightly strengthened and slavery in any territories of the Confederacy was protected. Thus the Confederacy was an operating country with a Provisional Constitution submitted to the states. The next order of business would be a Provisional President and Vice-President. Thus far harmony, wisdom, and patriotism had prevailed, for there was little of the fire-eater apparent in the deliberations or in the Constitution. (the Constitution and Resolutions and Acts and … of the Confederacy can be viewed at http://docsouth.unc.edu/imls/19conf/19conf.html)

Operating under orders of Gov. Henry M. Rector of Arkansas, state troops seized the U.S. Arsenal at Little Rock, the Federal garrison of Capt. James Totten evacuating under force. It contained 9,000 small arms, 40 cannons, and large quantities of ammunition.

In Washington President Buchanan approved a loan of $25,000,000 for current expenses and redemption of treasury notes.

President-elect Lincoln accepts invitation of Pennsylvania Legislature to visit Harrisburg. Also accepts invitation to visit Cleveland, Ohio. The Lincoln family moved from his home into a hotel.

The voters of Tennessee vote against holding a State Convention: yeas 54,156, neas 67,360.

Five New York ships seized by order of the Georgia Governnor, to be held until certain guns on board the vessel Monticello, seized by New York City police, are delivered to agents of Georgia. In addition, the Georgia Governor orders the Collector of the port of Savannah, Georgia, to retain all moneys from customs in his possession, and make no payment on accounts of the Federal Government.

A Cheyenne delegation and some Arapaho leaders accepted a new settlement (Treaty of Fort Wise) with the U.S. Federal government. The deal ceded most of their land but secured a 600-square mile reservation and annuity payments.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 10:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 9, 1861 Saturday
Jefferson Davis Elected Provisional President Of The Confederacy

Who was to be President of the new Confederacy? For several days there had been extensive discussion and private electioneering at Montgomery, Ala., among the delegates to the secession convention. To avoid a contest on the floor it was thought necessary to agree on the man beforehand. Names considered included William Lowndes Yancey, Howell Cobb, Robert Toombs, Alexander H. Stephens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, and Jefferson Davis. During the night of the eighth, various state delegations met. Georgia withdrew her candidate Toombs in face of the decision of most states for Davis. Jefferson Davis of Mississippi, former Secretary of War and U.S. Senator, rated as a moderate among secessionists, was unanimously chosen Provisional President of the Confederate States of America, subject to an election. Georgia presented Alexander Stephens, long-time U.S. representative and former Whig leader, for Vice-President. He, too, was chosen unanimously. There were a few doubts about Stephens, for it seemed to some he had always been a unionist at heart. The Confederacy now had leaders representing the old Democrats and the old Whigs rather than the more rabid secessionists. Davis and Stephens pleased many in the mid-South and border states not yet out of the Union. The time was to come when citizens of the South and historians alike would condemn both Davis and Stephens. But at the moment they seemed wisely selected.

With deliberate and careful proceedings the convention at Montgomery had chosen their leaders under a sense of responsibility instead of the usual raucousness of politics. They were in a hurry through necessity, but not so much that they could not do their job. The provincial-appearing capital of Alabama was crowded with visitors, some of them more openly enthusiastic than the delegates. The leaders, for the most part, wanted the mildest possible break with the past and the Union, and there was even the feeling that the North, not the South, had actually broken away from the spirit and purpose of the founders of the United States.

In addition to choosing its leaders, the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy declared all laws of the United States in force as long as they were not inconsistent with the Constitution of the Confederacy.

In Tennessee voters rejected the proposal to call a convention to consider secession by 68,282 to 59,449.

U.S.S. Brooklyn, commanded by Captain Walker, arrived off Pensacola. Troops were not landed at Fort Pickens in compliance with the order of 29 January, based on an interim agreement with Florida officials in which the status quo would be maintained (i.e., Forts Barrancas and McRee and Navy Yard remained in Confederate hands while the Union held Fort Pickens on Santa Rosa Island). Brooklyn, Sabine, Macedonia, and St. Louis remained off the harbor, but reinforcements were not put ashore at Fort Pickens until 12 April.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 10:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 10, 1861 Sunday
At the plantation home of Brierfield in Warren County, Miss., not far from Vicksburg, former U.S. Senator Jefferson Davis, now commander of the state forces of Mississippi, was helping his wife Varina prune rosebushes. A messenger arrived from Vicksburg bearing the telegram from Montgomery naming Mr. Davis President of the new nation. Reportedly Davis was stunned by the news. He had not sought nor wanted such a position; his aim had been a high military command in the Confederacy. That evening the message of acceptance was sent to Montgomery and plans were made to leave at once for the capital.

Lincoln spends day with Springfield friends. Lincoln meets with his law partner William H. Herndon in their office. The two men go "over the books" and make plans "for the completion of all unsettled and unfinished matters." Herndon recalls that Lincoln looks at the law partnership's "sign-board" and comments, "Let it hang there undisturbed." They walk together until near Lincoln's home.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Thu Feb 10, 2011 10:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 11, 1861 Monday
Two Presidents Depart

From Springfield, Ill., President-elect Abraham Lincoln of the United States of America departed on a long trip to Washington and inauguration. From Brierfield Plantation on the Mississippi, President-elect Jefferson Davis of the Confederate States of America departed on a long trip to Montgomery, Ala., and inauguration.

More than a thousand citizens gathered in the early morning drizzle at the Great Western Station in Springfield to hear Mr. Lincoln, at times shaken with emotion, surrounded by the party of family, secretaries, dignitaries, and army officers, spoke from the rear train platform. “Here I have lived a quarter of a century, and passed from a young to an old man … I now leave, not knowing when, or whether ever, I may return, with a task before me greater than that which rested upon Washington. Without the assistance of that Divine Being, who ever attended him, I cannot succeed. With that assistance, I cannot fail. Trusting in Him, who can go with me, and remain with you, and be every where for good, let us confidently hope that all will yet be well. To His care commending you, as I hope in your prayers you will commend me, I bid you an affectionate farewell.” Lincoln's trip took him, among other places, through Indianapolis (February 11); Cincinnati (February 12); Columbus, Ohio (February 13); Pittsburgh (February 14); Cleveland (February 15); Buffalo (February 16); Albany (February 18); New York City (Februa ry 19); Trenton, New Jersey, and Philadelphia (February 20); Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and back to Philadelphia (February 22); Baltimore and Washington (February 23).

As the train rolled slowly eastward across Illinois and Indiana, several stops were made for the President-elect to greet enthusiastic crowds. At Decatur, Ill., Lincoln moves rapidly through crowd at depot, shaking hands right and left. Makes brief remarks at Tolono and Danville, Ill. At 12:30 P.M. train arrives at Indiana State Line where he is welcomed by committee of state legislature headed by Capt. Frederick Steele. Here Great Western joins Toledo and Wabash, and large numbers of Indiana politicians board train. At Lafayette, Ind., Lincoln says: "While some of us may differ in political opinions, still we are all united in one feeling for the Union. We all believe in the maintainance of the Union, of every star and every stripe of the glorious flag, and permit me to express the sentiment that upon the union of the States, there shall be between us no difference." Greets people at Thorntown and Lebanon, Ind. Every station along route has its crowd. At Indianapolis he was met by Gov. Oliver P. Morton and receives 34-gun salute, and a huge procession of some twenty thousand escorted Mr. Lincoln to the Bates House. At the hotel he told the throng, “It is your business to rise up and preserve the Union and liberty, for yourselves, and not for me.” He said he opposed invasion or coercion of a state but that enforcement of the laws and holding of Federal property were not coercion. He spoke of those who in his words believed the Union not a regular marriage “but only a sort of free-love arrangement.” At 7 P.M. begins greeting no fewer than 3,000 persons during impromptu reception in main parlor. Becomes excited over temporary loss of satchel containing copies of Inaugural Address.

At Brierfield Plantation Jefferson Davis bid farewell to family and plantation slaves before taking a boat alone for Vicksburg and eventually Montgomery, Ala. (February 16), via Jackson, Miss., Chattanooga, and Atlanta. The trip was difficult due to lack of a direct railroad, poor traveling accommodations, and the haste with which the journey was made. In Vicksburg the Confederate President-elect made the first of many brief speeches declaring he had struggled earnestly to maintain the Union and the “constitutional equality of all the States.” But “our safety and honor required us to dissolve our connection with the United States. I hope that our separation may be peaceful. But whether it be so or not, I am ready, as I always have been, to redeem my pledges to you and the South by shedding every drop of my blood in your cause …”

In a simple, unprepared ceremony at Montgomery, Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia was inaugurated Provisional Vice-President of the Confederate States of American. In its speed to get things moving, the convention or Provisional Congress had decided not to await the arrival of the President-elect. Stephens, a small, sallow, emaciated wisp of a man with chronically poor health, took the oath upon his own birth date but declined to make any policy statement. At Austin, Tex., the State Convention voted in favor of formation of a Southern Confederacy and elected seven delegates to Congress.

The Electoral College begins to meet amid fears of a show of force against the election of Abraham Lincoln. General Winfield Scott reinforces the city and the meeting occurs as planned. Vice-president John C. Breckinridge declares Lincoln the winner of the Election of 1860.

Commander Dahlgren urged Congress to approve the building of more gun-sloops and an "iron-cased" ship.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 8:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 12, 1861 Tuesday
Jefferson Davis traveled from Vicksburg to Jackson, Miss., where he resigned as Major General of the Mississippi state forces, and is reported to have stated that war “could” result from secession. Crowds were reported large and enthusiastic on the route and Mr. Davis made about twenty-five brief stops in his passage to Montgomery.

This was President-elect Lincoln’s fifty-second birthday. After breakfasting at governor's mansion, Lincoln accompanies Gov. Morton (Ind.) to Capitol, where he exchanges greetings with members of legislature. Shortly after 10 A.M. he appears for third time on balcony of Bates House and, in response to crowd which had gathered, makes practically same remarks as on previous evening. Welcomes Mrs. Lincoln and sons to presidential party and takes affectionate leave of old Illinois friends, Jesse K. Dubois and Ebenezer Peck. Boards train at 11 A.M., escorted by governor and committee from legislature. Meets welcoming committee from Ohio and Kentucky on train. Speaks from rear platform at Indiana towns of Morris, Shelbyville, Greensburg, and Lawrenceburg, during four-hour ride to Cincinnati. Arrives in Cincinnati shortly after 3 P.M., receives immense ovation, and is welcomed by Mayor Richard M. Bishop. Rides in carriage with mayor, escorted by Washington Dragoon regiment, for two hours and arrives at Burnet House, where he addresses huge crowd: "I hope that, although we have some threatening National difficulties now—I hope that while these free institutions shall continue to be in the enjoyment of millions of free people of the United States, we will see repeated every four years what we now witness." Attends public reception in hotel dining room during evening. Goes to balcony at 8 P.M. and speaks to several thousand members of German Industrial Association: "I deem it my duty—a duty which I owe my constituents—to you, gentlemen, that I should wait until the last moment, for a development of the present national difficulties, before I express myself decidedly what course I shall pursue. . . . Mr. Chairman, I hold that while man exists, it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind; and therefore, without entering upon the details of the question, I will simply say that I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number."

At Montgomery the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy provided for a Peace Commission to the United States and also assumed authority to deal with questions of the forts in dispute.

Acting Postmaster General Horatio King, named by President Buchanan in January, became Postmaster General for the last month of the old administration.

Arkansas state forces seized the U.S. ordnance stores at Napoleon, Ark.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 9:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 13, 1861 Wednesday
While in Washington the official count of presidential electoral votes made the election of Lincoln official, the President-elect Lincoln and party, under escort of committee from Ohio Legislature, leave Burnet House in Cincinnati at 8:30 A.M. in eight carriages for depot of Little Miami Railroad and leave city at 9 A.M. Lincoln makes short speeches at Ohio towns of Milford, Loveland, Miamiville, Morrow, Corwin, Xenia, and London. Arrives in Columbus at 2 P.M. Receives national salute; gets enthusiastic welcome from crowd of 60,000. At Capitol Lt. Gov. Robert C. Kirk (Ohio) introduces him before joint meeting of legislature. In Columbus, Lincoln speaks to Ohio's General Assembly. He acknowledges that he has revealed little about "the policy of the new administration." Lincoln explains, "In the varying and repeatedly shifting scenes of the present, and without a precedent which could enable me to judge by the past, it has seemed fitting that before speaking upon the difficulties of the country, I should have gained a view of the whole field . . . being at liberty to modify and change the course of policy, as future events may make a change necessary." In one of his most puzzling speeches Mr. Lincoln also said, “I have not maintained silence from any want of real anxiety. It is a good thing that there is no more than anxiety, for there is nothing going wrong. It is a consoling circumstance that when we look out there is nothing that really hurts anybody. We entertain different views upon political questions, but nobody is suffering anything.” Speaks to public from steps of Capitol immediately following visit to legislature: "The manifestations of good-will towards the government, and affection for the Union which you may exhibit are of immense value to you and your posterity forever." At 4:30 P.M. receives telegram from Washington, informing him that he is duly elected President of the United States. Attends levee in full evening dress for members of legislature, army and militia officers, Lincoln party, and special guests at residence of Gov. William Dennison (Ohio). Returns to Capitol after supper and again receives public. Later accompanies Governor to Deshler Hall, where guards are giving military ball in his honor. Leads grand promenade with captain's wife. Lincoln family spends night as guests at governor's home.

Far to the south Mr. Davis was continuing his own journey.

In Richmond the Virginia State Convention assembled to consider the question of secession. A majority of the delegates were believed to be unionists, at least at this time.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 14, 1861 Thursday
Lincoln and family leave governor's mansion in Columbus at 7 A.M. under escort for depot. Train departs shortly before 8 A.M. with throngs of people standing under umbrellas waving farewells. Responds to welcome at Ohio towns of Newark, Frazeysburg, Dresden, Coshocton, Newcomerstown, Uhrichsville, Cadiz Junction, Steubenville, Wellsville, and at Pennsylvania towns of Rochester, Allegheny City, and Pittsburgh. At Cadiz Junction Lincoln dines at Parks House; later remarks to crowd from platform of car that he is "too full for utterance." Receives welcome from Judge Lloyd and approximately 10,000 people gathered around carpeted stage near railroad tracks in Steubenville. Replies: "We everywhere express devotion to the Constitution. I believe there is no difference in this respect, whether on this or on the other side of this majestic stream. . . . The question is, as to what the Constitution means— . . . To decide that, who shall be the judge? Can you think of any other, than the voice of the people?" Leaves Steubenville at 2:30 P.M. and shortly arrives at Wellsville where he makes brief remarks from platform of rear car. Escort committees from Allegheny City and Cleveland are on board. At Rochester Lincoln answers question, "What will you do with the secessionists then?" by saying, "My friend, that is a matter which I have under very grave consideration." Arrives at Allegheny City at 8 P.M., having been delayed two hours by broken-down freight train near Freedom, Ohio. Acknowledges welcome of mayor in rain and enters carriage for Monongahela House in Pittsburgh across river. ["We finally got Mr. Lincoln into a carriage; but . . . it looked for a while as if we would never get the carriage out of the crowd that was pushing and yelling all around us." Large crowds in rain and mud block streets to hotel and pack lobby. Standing on chair in lobby of Monongahela House Lincoln reflects: "I could not help thinking, my friends, as I traveled in the rain through your crowded streets, on my way here, that if all that people were in favor of the Union, it can certainly be in no great danger—it will be preserved. . . . Well, my friends, as it is not much I have to say, and as there may be some uncertainty of another opportunity, I will utter it now, if you will permit me to procure a few notes." Returns and announces he has been persuaded to finish speech in morning.

For those who would like to follow what was going on in Texas during this period, excellent documentation is located at http://digital.library.cornell.edu/cgi/ ... =frameset;

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 11:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 15, 1861 Friday
The President-elect of the new Confederacy drew nearer to his new capital of Montgomery.

At 8:30 A.M. Lincoln appears on balcony of Monongahela House, and delivers longest address of journey. Multitude of 5,000 stands in rain in front of hotel. Mayor George Wilson introduces Lincoln, who repeats remarks made in Columbus, Ohio then comments on tariff: "So long as direct taxation for the support of government is not resorted to, a tariff is necessary. . . . I have long thought that if there be any article of necessity which can be produced at home with as little or nearly the same labor as abroad, it would be better to protect that article. Labor is the true standard of value. . . . According to my political education, I am inclined to believe that the people in the various sections of the country should have their own views carried out through their representatives in Congress, . . . so that . . . adequate protection can be extended to the coal and iron of Pennsylvania, the corn of Illinois, and the 'reapers of Chicago.' " Lincoln visits Leonard Swett, elector-at-large from Illinois, who has been detained at hotel several weeks by sickness. Train departs 10 A.M. and retraces journey through Rochester, Pa., to Wellsville, Ohio. Lincoln tells assemblage at Wellsville that he will not speak, because he did so day before. At Salineville and Bayard, Ohio, responds to cheering crowds by saluting and bowing. At Alliance, Ohio, he offers remarks that now have become routine: "I appear before you merely to greet you and say farewell. . . . If I should make a speech at every town, I would not get to Washington until some time after the inauguration." Accepts hospitality of John N. McCullough, president of railroad, and has dinner at Sourbeck's Hotel. Company of Canton Zouaves stands guard, band plays national airs, and gun salute shatters window during meal, sprinkling glass on Mrs. Lincoln. From temporary stand in front of depot, Lincoln thanks citizens for rousing reception and excuses himself from speaking. At Hudson, Ohio, crowd engulfs train. Lincoln steps out on train platform and remarks: "You see by my voice that I am quite hoarse. You will not, therefore, expect a speech from me." At Ravenna, Ohio, says: "There are doubtless those here who did not vote for me, but I believe we make common cause for the Union." Lincoln, less talkative during day, sits in rear car reading newspapers and reflecting. Accepts invitation of Select and Common Councils of Philadelphia to visit city and sets 21st as date. Arrives at Cleveland in snow storm. Detrains two miles from center of city. "Deafening shout from tens of thousands was re-echoed by roar of artillery." Enters open carriage at approximately 4:30 P.M. Escort of military (Cleveland Grays) and fire companies joins procession to Weddell House. Acting Mayor J. N. Masters and Judge Sherlock J. Andrews welcome him. Lincoln replies: "I think that there is no occasion for any excitement. The crisis, as it is called, is altogether an artificial crisis." Attends brilliant reception in his honor given in evening. Separate levee held for Mrs. Lincoln. At 10 P.M. Lincoln and suite are guests at supper in Weddell House, where they have lodgings. Another version of temporary loss of First Inaugural Address has it occurring in Cleveland, where it is mislaid by Robert Lincoln.

The Peace Conference at Washington had been droning on, but this day a committee presented its resolutions. The Conference at large began lengthy discussions of these proposals.

Various officers of the Army and Navy were beginning to decide their allegiance, and Raphael Semmes, outstanding naval officer later captain of C.S.S. Sumter and Alabama, resigned to join the Navy of the new Confederacy.

The provisional Confederate government, after assuming responsibility for questions concerning forts, arsenals, and other federal property within the states of the Confederacy, resolved on February 15 that "immediate steps should be taken to obtain possession of forts Sumter and Pickens . . . either by negotiations or force." It authorized President-elect Davis to carry the resolution into effect. Under this authority, Davis took charge of the military operations in Charleston Harbor on February 22, 1861. Ironically, Davis and Anderson were old friends. During the Black Hawk War, the two young West Point graduates were in charge of guarding the captured Indian leader.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 9:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 16, 1861 Saturday
“The man and the hour have met” --- President Davis Arrives In Montgomery

A deeply tired and concerned Jefferson Davis arrived in Montgomery, Ala., to accept the post of Provisional President of the new Confederacy. Upon arrival he told his greeters, “The time for compromise has now passed, and the South is determined to maintain her position, and make all who oppose her smell Southern powder and feel Southern steel if coercion is persisted in … We ask nothing, we want nothing; we have no complications.”

That evening at the Exchange Hotel, William Lowndes Yancey, a stirring orator proclaimed in memorable words that the country had found the statesman, the soldier, and the patriot to lead them: “The man and the hour have met.” Mr. Davis said, “It may be that our career will be ushered in in the midst of a storm; it may be that, as this morning opened with clouds, rain and mist, we shall have to encounter inconveniences at the beginning; but, as the sun rose and lifted the mist, it dispersed the clouds and left us the pure sunshine of heaven. So will progress the Southern Confederacy, and carry us safe into the harbor of constitutional liberty and political equality … “

Militia company of Cleveland Grays escorts Lincoln from hotel to 9 A.M. train. Leland's Brass Band entertains at depot. Train stops at Ohio towns of Willoughby, Painesville, Geneva, Madison, Ashtabula, Conneaut, at Pennsylvania towns of Girard, Erie, Northeast, and at New York towns of Westfield, Dunkirk, and Silver Creek, arriving Buffalo 4:30 P.M. On board are committees from Ohio Legislature, Cleveland, Erie, Chautauqua County, N.Y., and Buffalo. At Willoughby Lincoln has time to say good morning and goodbye. At Painesville he speaks from special platform to estimated 3,000 persons in response to introduction by Mayor Wilcox. Train stops one minute at Geneva and Lincoln replies to introduction by Mr. Bearse. At Madison he compliments crowd of ladies during brief stop. Crowd calls for Mrs. Lincoln at Ashtabula, and President-elect remarks that "he should hardly hope to induce her to appear, as he had always found it very difficult to make her do what she did not want to." At Conneaut Lincoln thanks "people for the kindly demonstration." Horace Greeley boards train at Girard and rides to Erie. Lincoln greets crowd and receives baskets of fruit. At 12:22 P.M. presidential party detrains at Erie, and committee escorts it to dining room of railroad company, where Lincoln makes speech. At Northeast he delivers brief remarks from rear platform. Lincoln's train stops in Westfield, New York, where a "large crowd" greets him. Lincoln remarks that Westfield is the home of twelve-year-old Grace Bedell, who "advised me to let my whiskers grow." Lincoln adds, "[A]cting partly upon her suggestion, I have done so; and now, if she is here, I would like to see her." Before he departs, Lincoln locates the "beautiful girl, with black eyes" and gives her "several hearty kisses . . . amid the yells of delight from the excited crowd." Crowd of 15,000 citizens of Chautauqua County greets Lincoln at Dunkirk. From trackside platform he says: "Standing as I do, with my hand upon this staff, and under the folds of the American flag, I Ask You to Stand by Me so Long as I Stand by It." Train stops momentarily at Silver Creek, but Lincoln is resting for entrance to Buffalo. Former President Millard Fillmore and crowd of 10,000 welcome presidential party to Buffalo at 4:30 P.M. Guard of soldiers and police being unable to prevent disorderly jam, guests are jostled and separated; Maj. David Hunter's arm is dislocated, and members of presidential partywalk to hotel. Lincoln rides in procession with Acting Mayor A. S. Benies, Committee Chairman A. M. Clapp, and Ward Hill Lamon, former law partner of Lincoln and bodyguard during trip to Washington. Arriving at American House, speaks from balcony in reply to welcome by acting mayor: "It is most proper I should wait, see the developments, and get all the light I can, so that when I do speak authoritatively I may be as near right as possible. . . . allow me to say that you, as a portion of the great American people, need only to maintain your composure." Meets 34 members of Buffalo committee and governor's staff, who will accompany him to Albany. Holds public reception at 7:30 P.M. Later receives another welcoming committee of 20 Germans headed by ex-Alderman Jacob Beyer. Listens to serenades by two singing groups.

At San Antonio, Tex., the U.S. Arsenal and Barracks were seized by state troops led by Major Ben McCulloch.

The British consul at Pensacola throws down the gauntlet to challenge the possible blockade of the Confederate States of America when he issues clearance papers for a ship carrying a cargo of cotton for British textile mills.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 17, 1861 Sunday
This was a somewhat quieter day, with President-elect Lincoln in Buffalo and President-elect Davis in Montgomery. Former President Fillmore calls for Lincoln at 10 A.M. with carriage and takes him to Unitarian Church to hear Rev. George W. Hosmer. They return to hotel for Mrs. Lincoln, then drive to Fillmore's residence to dine. Back at hotel, Lincoln receives friends during afternoon; takes supper with family; afterwards attends service by Indian preacher, Father John Beason. Meanwhile, Davis was preparing for his inaugural on the morrow.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 9:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2258
Location: USA
February 18, 1861 Monday
Jefferson Davis Inaugurated President Of The Confederacy

In front of the state Capitol at Montgomery, Jefferson Davis of Mississippi was inaugurated Provisional President of the Confederate States of America. To the enthusiastic throng he spoke encouragement. To his wife he wrote, “The audience was large and brilliant. Upon my weary heart was showered smiles, plaudits, and flowers; but, beyond them, I saw troubles and thorns innumerable. We are without machinery, without means, and threatened by a powerful opposition; but I do not despond, and will not shrink from the task imposed upon me.” To the crowd he said, “Our present political position has been achieved in a manner unprecedented in the history of nations. It illustrates the American idea that governments rest on the consent of the governed, and that it is the right of the people to alter or abolish them at will whenever they become destructive of the ends for which they were established.” The original purpose of the Union had been perverted, Mr. Davis said. The South had labored to preserve the government of their fathers and had no “interest or passion to invade the rights of others, … “ He hoped to avoid war but if the “lust of dominion should cloud the judgment or inflame the ambition of those States, we must prepare to meet the emergency and maintain, by the final arbitrament of the sword, the position which we have assumed among the nations of the earth.” Reunion was neither practicable nor desirable. However, the Confederate government was the same as that of the Constitution in principle. “Obstacles may retard, but they can not long prevent, the progress of a movement sanctified by its justice and sustained by a virtuous people.”

It was a balmy and sunny day and Davis rode in a carriage up the hill to the Capitol, tall, sight, but straight, with his sharply defined features set in deep thought as he received the cheers of the throng and heard the bands play “Dixie.” After the inauguration a levee, more bands, fireworks, banners, and a salute of a hundred guns. All people seemed to join in, Negroes included. Eyes were wet when the new President bowed his head in tears after solemnly, earnestly intoning “So help me God,” hand on the Bible. It was a time of high resolve, of great hopes, of emotional outpouring, and of challenge and wonder as well. Many, including the new President, had their grave doubts but, on this day at least, events had culminated and a new nation was fully on its way – but its direction, its future, its confirmation was uncertain.

Mr. Lincoln proceeded through New York State from Buffalo to Albany with the same cheering throngs as before. Several hundred persons and military escort witness Lincoln's departure by train at 5:45 A.M. Horace Greeley again on board. Stops made at New York towns of Batavia, Rochester, Clyde, Syracuse, Utica, Little Falls, Fonda, Amsterdam, and Schenectady. At Syracuse Lincoln disappoints crowd of 10,000 by speaking from train instead of from platform in front of Globe Hotel. Acknowledges remarks of welcome by mayor of Utica. At Schenectady does not mount special platform in replying to introduction by Judge Platt Potter of Supreme Court. Receives enthusiastic welcome upon arrival in Albany at 2:30 P.M. Exchanges short speeches on train platform with Mayor George H. Thatcher before entering open carriage for ride to state Capitol, where he receives, and replies to, welcome by governor and staff. Immediately afterwards addresses joint meeting of legislature: "It is true that while I hold myself without mock modesty, the humblest of all individuals that have ever been elevated to the Presidency, I have a more difficult task to perform than any one of them. . . . I still have confidence that the Almighty, the Maker of the Universe will . . . bring us through this as He has through all the other difficulties of our country." Thurlow Weed interviews Lincoln at Delavan House where presidential party is staying. Rail Splitters, political club, present bouquet. Committee to escort him to New York calls. Lincoln receives committee from Troy, N.Y., and accepts invitation for next day to "spend just as much time with you as the train permits." Lincoln and Morgan families have evening meal at governor's mansion. Lincoln returns to Delavan House for levee at 9 P.M. and greets individually about 1,000 persons; also visits levee held for ladies.

At San Antonio, Tex., Bvt. Maj. Gen. David E. Twiggs surrendered U.S. military posts in the Department of Texas to the state. He said he did it in the face of the threat of force, but in Washington his move was regarded as treason.

Maryland convenes a secessionist convention in Baltimore to consider its options.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 384 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 26  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 29 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: