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 Post subject: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2012 7:29 pm 
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January 1, 1863 Thursday
“I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free.” Thus read the final Emancipation Proclamation ( http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/featur ... clamation/ ) of Jan 1, putting into effect President Lincoln’s preliminary proclamation of Sept 22. Even that very morning discussions had continued, but shortly after noon the President signed the document that opened the door to the end of slavery in the United States. No slaves were freed specifically at that moment, for the Proclamation pertained on to areas “the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States.” These areas were indicated. However, as Federal armies advanced into these areas, the slaves were to be free. Further, this final Proclamation provided that former slaves would be officially received into the armed services of the nation. In Tremont Temple, Boston, people met in celebration; at Norfolk, Virginia the Negro populace marched through the town, Union flag at their head, cheering; at Beaufort, South Carolina the freedmen heard speeches, sang an “Ode for Emancipation Day,” and enjoyed five roasted oxen.

In Tennessee at Murfreesboro the armies of Bragg and Rosecrans were poised, awaiting renewal of the struggle along Stone’s River. Some troops were shifted and Bragg made a slight indication of attack; there was skirmishing at La Vergne, Stewart’s Creek, and Clifton, Tennessee. Sherman was about to abandon his efforts at Chickasaw Bayou north of Vicksburg; there was an affair near Helena, Arkansas; and a skirmish at Bath Springs, Mississippi.

Confederate warships under Major Leon Smith, CSA, defeated Union blockading forces at Galveston in a fierce surprise attack combined with an assault ashore by Confederate troops that resulted in the capture of the Northern Army company stationed there. Smith's flotilla included the improvised cotton-clad gunboats C.S.S. Bayou City and Neptune, with Army sharpshooting boarding parties embarked, and tenders John F. Carr and Lucy Gwin. The Union squadron under Commander William B. Renshaw, U.S.S. Harriet Lane, Owasco, Corypheus, Sachem, Clifton, and Westfield, was caught off guard. Despite the surprise, Harriet Lane, under Commander Jonathan M. Wainwright, put up a gallant fight. She rammed Bayou City, but without much damage. In turn she was rammed by Neptune, which was so damaged by the resulting impact and a shot from Harriet Lane taken at the waterline that she sank in 8 feet of water. Bayou City, meanwhile, turned and rammed Harriet Lane so heavily that the two ships could not be separated. The troops from the cotton-clad clambered over the bulwarks to board Harriet Lane. under Commander Wainwright was killed in the wild hand-to-hand combat and his ship was captured.
In the meantime at Galveston, Westfield, under Commander Renshaw, had run aground in Bolivar Channel prior to the action, could not be gotten off, and was destroyed to prevent her capture. Renshaw and a boat crew were killed when Westfield blew up prematurely. The small ships comprising the remainder of the blockading force ran through heavy Confederate fire from ashore and stood out to sea. Surprise and boldness in execution, as often in the long history of warfare, had won another victory. The tribute paid by Major General John Bankhead Magruder, CSA, was well deserved: "The alacrity with which officers and men, all of them totally unacquainted with this novel kind of service, some of whom had never seen a ship before, volunteered for an enterprise so extraordinarily and apparently desperate in its character, and the bold and dashing manner in which the plan was executed, are certainly deserving of the highest praise."

In Washington the after effects of Fredericksburg came to a head. Burnside consulted with President Lincoln on the general’s plans to launch another assault across the Rappahannock River. Burnside then wrote a frank, open, modest letter stating that officers and men lacked faith in Sec of War Stanton, in Halleck, and in himself. Burnside pointed out that not a single grand division commander agreed with his plan and that in view of this he believed he should retire to private life, to “promote the public good.” President Lincoln goaded Halleck into deciding on the military plan and this provoked a resignation from the General-in-Chief. The windup – both Halleck and Burnside stayed. President Lincoln’s tiring day included the usual New Year’s Day reception at the White House.

At Charleston, South Carolina one Robert Yeadon offered $10,000 reward for the capture and delivery of Ben Butler, dead or alive.

The extensive use of Confederate torpedoes in the western waters required similar ingenuity on the part of Union forces to cope with them. Colonel Charles R. Ellet proposed a plan to clear the Yazoo of torpedoes, to enable the gunboats to operate more freely. He wrote: "My plan was to attach to the bow of a swift and powerful steamboat [Lioness was chosen] a strong framework, consisting of two heavy spars, 65 feet in length, firmly secured by transverse and diagonal braces and extending 50 feet forward of the steamer's bow. A crosspiece, 35 feet in length, was to be bolted to the forward extremities of these spars. Through each end of this crosspiece and through the center a heavy iron rod, 1 1/2 inches in diameter and 10 feet long, descended into the river, terminating in a hook. An intermediate hook was attached to each bar 3 feet from the bottom. The three bars were strengthened by a light piece of timber halfway down, through which they were passed and bolted. . . . The torpedoes are sunk in the water, but the cords by which they are fired are attached to buoys floating on the surface. My belief was that the curved hooks of the rake would catch these cords, and, driven by the powerful boat, would either explode the torpedoes or tear them to pieces and break the ropes, thus rendering them harmless to succeeding vessels." In fundamental principle, the method compares with the sweeping of mines in World War II and Korea.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:41 pm 
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January 2, 1863 Friday
The main fighting at Murfreesboro was on the northeast side of Stone’s River. John C. Breckinridge’s Confederates succeeded in taking a small hill, only to be driven off with great loss by Federal guns and a countercharge. Again the armies of Bragg and Rosecrans paused on the battlefield, each expecting or hoping the other would withdraw ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stones_River ). Brigadier General Roger Weightman Hanson ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_W._Hanson ), CSA, is mortally wounded during the Battle of Stones River (Murfreesboro), Tennessee, while leading his command in a charge. He dies two days later, January 4, 1863.

Losses for the entire battle are put at 1677 Federals killed, 7543 wounded, and 3686 missing for 12,906 out of 41,400 estimated effectives; 1294 Confederates killed, 7945 wounded, about 2500 missing for a total of 11,739 out of estimated effectives of 35,000.

A Confederate in the ranks wrote of the battle: “I am sick and tired of this war, and, I can see no prospects of having peace for a long time to come, I don’t think it ever will be stopped by fighting, the Yankees cant whip us and we can never whip them, and I see no prospect of peace unless the Yankees themselves rebel and throw down their arms, and refuse to fight any longer.”

North of Vicksburg on the Yazoo River, Sherman gave up his hopeless drive against the bluffs and withdrew to the Mississippi River, where his forces came under orders of McClernand. Both Morgan and Forrest completed their campaigns; Morgan recrossed the Cumberland River, while Forrest recrossed the Tennessee River at Clifton, Tennessee. Another Confederate raider, John S. Marmaduke, skirmished with Federals at White Springs and Boston Mountains in Arkansas in his advance on Missouri which started from Lewisburg, Arkansas Dec 31. Other fighting included a skirmish near Fort Donelson, Tennessee; a skirmish at Jonesville in Lee County, Virginia; an expedition to Moorefield and Petersburg, West Virginia by Federals; and the reoccupation of New Madrid, Missouri by Union troops. James Murrell Schackelford, USA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

Salutes, celebrations, and meetings followed the Emancipation Proclamation in many Northern cities. In Richmond, belt tightening and high prices were among the new year’s gifts to the Confederate people. Gen Butler states that President Lincoln has asked him to go to Mississippi and organize Negro troops.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2013 11:33 pm 
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January 3, 1863 Saturday
Federals pushed two brigades forward at Murfreesboro in a mild attack on Southern lines near Stone’s River. During the night, Bragg’s Confederate Army of Tennessee, despite apparent victory in their first stages of the battle, withdrew from Murfreesboro toward Tullahoma, Tennessee.

Confederates failed in an attack on Moorefield, West Virginia; and there was skirmishing at Burnsville, Mississippi; Somerville, and Insane Asylum, Cox’s Hill, or Blood’s, Tennessee. U.S.S. Currituck, commanded by Acting Master Thomas J. Linnekin, captured sloop Potter between the mouths of the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers. Confederate commerce raiding schooner Retribution, Master Thomas B. Power; chased merchant ships Gilmore Meredith and Westward back into the harbor at Havana.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Thu Jan 03, 2013 7:20 pm 
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January 4, 1863 Sunday
Major General John A. McClernand, USA, starts his unauthorized transfer of the Federal Army of the Mississippi from Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, to the mouth of the White River, Arkansas. The transfer took five days. A joint Army-Navy expedition under Rear Admiral David D. Porter and Major General W. T. Sherman (under orders from Maj Gen McClernand) got underway up the White River, Arkansas, aiming at the capture of Fort Hindman at Arkansas Post. Hindman, described by Porter as a "tough little nut," mounted 11 guns. With a small coal supply available, Porter had the gunboats towed upriver by Army transports to conserve his fuel as much as possible. The gunboats included U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, Louisville, Cincinnati, Signal, Marmora, Lexington, New Era, Romeo, Rattler, Glide, and flagship Black Hawk. This date Porter also ordered ram Monarch to join him at the mouth of the Arkansas River.

There was skirmishing at Murfreesboro and on the Manchester Pike as Bragg continued to withdraw. There was other fighting at Monterey, Tennessee and a scout Jan 4-6 by Federals from Ozark, Missouri to Dubuque, Arkansas. Beginning in January and continuing until May, there were continuous operations against Indians in New Mexico Territory by forces of the United States. Brigadier General Roger Weightman Hanson ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_W._Hanson ), CSA, dies from his wounds inflicted on January 2, 1862, during the Battle of Stones River (Murfreesboro), Tennessee, while leading his command in a charge.

In Washington Gen Halleck, ordered by the President, instructed Grant to revoke General Order No 11, the controversial document expelling Jews from his department. Grant complied on Jan 7. A blockade-runner with important dispatches aboard was captured off Charleston by U.S.S. Quaker City.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2013 6:32 pm 
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January 5, 1863 Monday
Federal troops entered Murfreesboro, although fighting on a minor scale continued at Lytle’s Creek, on the Manchester Pike, and on the Shelbyville Pike, Tennessee. Confederates raided near Moorefield, West Virginia and there was a skirmish at Cub Run, Virginia.

President Lincoln tendered the thanks of the country to Rosecrans for his Tennessee victory. In Richmond President Davis, being welcomed home from his trip west, told a serenading crowd that the Confederacy was the last hope “for the perpetuation of that system of government which our forefathers founded – the asylum of the oppressed and the home of true representative liberty.” He went on, saying, “Every crime which could characterize the course of demons has marked the course of the invader.”

Burnside, pinned down at Fredericksburg, wrote President Lincoln that despite the opinion of his subordinate officers he still thought a crossing of the Rappahannock River should be attempted. Again he formally tendered his resignation, “to relieve you from all embarrassment in my case.”

Boat crews from U.S.S. Sagamore, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Earl English, seized blockade running British sloop Avenger in Jupiter Inlet, Florida, with cargo of coffee, gin, salt, and baled goods.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:36 pm 
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January 6, 1863 Tuesday
A day of light fighting along Linn Creek in Missouri, and at Fort Lawrence, Beaver Station, Missouri, part of the raid by Confederate John S. Marmaduke. A British steamer was seized off Mobile by the blockaders, one of the numerous captures by the day-in, day-out blockade of the Confederate coast. U.S.S. Pocahontas, commanded by Lieutenant Commander William M. Gamble, captured blockade runner Antona off Cape San Blas, Florida.

Confederate troops captured and burned steamboat Jacob Musselman near Memphis. The commander of the Confederate company, Captain James H. McGehee, was acting under orders to reconnoiter the area, "burning cotton in that country and annoying the enemy on the Mississippi River" wherever possible. Attacks such as this emphasized the Union's reliance on naval control of the water-ways to transport and convoy troops and supplies in areas already dominated by the North. Had this force afloat been weaker, the Confederacy might well have re-established vital positions in the west and elsewhere.

Assistant Adjutant General John A. Rawlins, writing from Holly Springs, Mississippi, informed Colonel William W. Lowe, commanding at Fort Henry, of a reported large number of "flat boats and other craft for crossing the Tennessee. You will therefore please request the gunboats, which are reported to be up the river, to use every means for their destruction, that the enemy may be prevented from crossing into West Tennessee and Kentucky. They should proceed up the river as far as the water will permit." The gunboats had constant work to do on the upper waters as well as near Vicksburg.

President Lincoln directs Sec Seward not to countersign the contract between U.S. government and B. Kock for colonizing 5,000 Negroes on Ile à Vache ( http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/te ... coln6%3A72 ).

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 7:05 pm 
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January 7, 1863 Wednesday
Marmaduke’s Confederates captured Ozark, Missouri and moved on Springfield. There was a scout from Big Spring Creek to Rock Ford, Mississippi. Jan 7-9 a Federal army-navy expedition operated from Yorktown to West Point and White House, Virginia.

A group of 450 women and children left Washington for Richmond, Virginia and the South with permission of the Federal government. The Richmond Enquirer called the Emancipation Proclamation “the most startling political crime, the most stupid political blunder, yet known in American history…. Southern people have now only to choose between victory and death.” Col Walter B. Scates, former chief justice of Illinois Supreme Court, hands to President Lincoln a letter from Gen McClernand protesting the Emancipation Proclamation as mitigating any chances of negotiating peace with the South.

Gen Halleck wrote Burnside a letter, endorsed by President Lincoln, emphasizing that “our first object was, not Richmond, but the defeat or scattering of Lee’s army.” He also strongly backed Burnside’s plan to attack across the Rappahannock. President Davis wrote Lee asking him to call upon the commander of U.S. forces and “prevent the savage atrocities which are threatened.” If this met a rebuff, Lee should tell the Federals that “measures will be taken by retaliation to repress the indulgence of such brutal passions.”

Confederate Secretary of the Navy Stephen R. Mallory wrote Commander James D. Bulloch in Liverpool regarding urgently needed ships to be built in England: ". . . Push these ships ahead as rapidly as possible. Our difficulty lies in providing you with funds, but you may rely upon receiving cotton certificates sooner or later. You speak of having under consideration plans of armored ships of about 2300 tons and to draw 14 feet, and of certain parties who are willing to build without cash advances, and to deliver the ships armed and equipped, beyond British jurisdiction. Close with this proposition at once by all means, and give any reasonable bonus after agreeing upon the times of such delivery, for earlier delivery, together with a bonus for extra speed. . . . I am convinced that every ship may and should be used as a ram when opportunities are presented. . . . Our river high-pressure boats, carrying their boilers on deck, frequently run against a sand bar or a snag, going at great speed, and bring all up standing, without deranging their boilers or engines in the least. The contact of the Virginia with the Cumberland was not felt on board the former, and the moving vessel that runs squarely into a stationary one rarely receives in jury."

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2013 8:20 pm 
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January 8, 1863 Thursday
The Federal garrison of Springfield, Missouri successfully defended the important Ozark area city from Marmaduke’s Confederates ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Bat ... pringfield ). Other fighting included a skirmish at Knob Creek near Ripley, Tennessee; an expedition by Federals from Suffolk toward the Blackwater River in Virginia; a Federal reconnaissance to Catlett’s and Rappahannock stations, Virginia; and a Federal scout from Elkhorn to Berryville, Arkansas, all three lasting until the tenth. Confederate Joseph Wheeler carried out a raid Jan 8-14, which included affairs at Mill Creek, Harpeth Shoals, and Ashland, Tennessee. U.S.S. Sagamore, commanded by Lieutenant Commander English, seized blockade running British sloop Julia off Jupiter Inlet with cargo of salt. U.S.S. Tahoma, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Alexander A. Semmes, captured blockade runner Silas Henry, aground in Tampa Bay with cargo of cotton. Brigadier General James Cantey, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

The U.S. Senate confirmed the nomination of John P. Usher of Indiana as Secretary of the Interior. Usher replaced Caleb Smith, who resigned due to ill health. President Lincoln wrote troubled Gen Burnside, “I deplore the want of concurrence with you, in opinion by your general officers, but I do not see the remedy. . . . I do not yet see how I could profit by changing the command of the A.P. & if I did, I should not wish to do it by accepting the resignation of your commission.” President Lincoln replies to Gen McClernand that the Emancipation Proclamation has been issued and "broken eggs can not be mended." President further said that “it must stand…. As to the States not included in it, of course they can have their rights in the Union as of old.”

President Davis wrote his commander in the West, Joseph E. Johnston, “To hold the Mississippi is vital.”

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Tue Jan 08, 2013 8:11 pm 
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January 9, 1863 Friday
The Federal Army of the Cumberland under Rosecrans was reorganized into three corps, the Fourteenth under George H. Thomas ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Henry_Thomas ), the Twentieth under Alexander McD McCook ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_McDowell_McCook ), and the Twenty-first under Thomas L Crittenden ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_L._Crittenden ). There was skirmishing at Fairfax Court House, Virginia. The Federal garrison at Hartville, Missouri surrendered to Marmaduke; Holly Springs, Mississippi was evacuated by Union forces. In Arkansas there was an expedition from Huntsville to Buffalo River. Salt works near St Joseph’s, Florida were destroyed by boat crews from U.S.S. Ethan Allen.

U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, Louisville, Cincinnati, Lexington, Rattler, and Black Hawk, under Rear Admiral Porter in tug Ivy, engaged and, with the troops of Major General W. T. Sherman, began the final approach to Fort Hindman at Arkansas Post. Ascending the Arkansas River, Porter's squadron covered the landing of the troops and shelled Confederates from their rifle pits, enabling McClernand's troops (Gen Sherman was currently serving under Gen McClernand) on 9 January to take command of the woods below the fort and approach unseen.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:11 pm 
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January 10, 1863 Saturday
Federal forces under McClernand had arrived the night of the ninth near Arkansas Post, or Fort Hindman, about fifty miles up the Arkansas River from its junction with the Mississippi River. Late in the morning McClernand started his envelopment of the Confederate fort and drove in upon the outer earthworks. Naval bombardment stopped Confederate artillery. Land units were poised to attack the besieged Confederates under Brig Gen T J Churchill ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_J._Churchill ). Though the Army was not in a position to press the attack on 10 January, the squadron moved to within 60 yards of the staunchly defended fort to soften the works for the next day's assault. A blistering engagement ensued, the fort's 11 guns pouring a withering fire into the gunboats. U.S.S. Rattler, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Watson Smith, attempted to run past the fort to provide enfilade support, but was caught on a snag placed in the river by the Confederates, received a heavy raking fire, and was forced to return downstream.

There was skirmishing at Carrollton, Arkansas and Clifton, Tennessee. Federal warships bombarded Galveston, Texas. President Lincoln wrote to Maj Gen Curtis in St Louis of his concern with the slave problem in Missouri. Maj Gen Fitz John Porter ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitz_John_Porter ) was sentenced by court-martial to be cashiered from the Army for his alleged failure to obey orders at Second Manassas. Camille Armand Jules Marie Prince de Polignac, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

U.S.S. Octorara, under Commander Napoleon Collins, captured blockade running British schooner Rising Dawn in North West Providence Channel with large cargo of salt.

C.S.S. Retribution, Master Power, captured brig J. P. Ellicott, bound from Boston to Cienfuegos. Next day, she was retaken by her own crew from the Confederate prize crew and sailed to St. Thomas Island where she was turned over to U.S.S. Alabama, under Commander Edward T. Nichols.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Thu Jan 10, 2013 8:50 pm 
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January 11, 1863 Sunday
Gunboats under David Dixon Porter ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Dixon_Porter ) battered Confederate guns at Fort Hindman, Arkansas and land forces of McClernand began their attack, which continued for three and a half hours. Porter received white flags at the fort and the vastly outnumbered Confederates in the outerworks surrendered. Federal losses were 134 killed, 898 wounded, and 29 missing for a total of 1061 out of 29,000 effectives and 13 gunboats; Confederates lost 28 killed, 81 wounded for a total of 109, with missing (mainly captured) put at 4791, out of close to 5000 ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Hindman ). While the operation was successful, it failed to help the Vicksburg campaign materially. Grant ordered McClernand to return from this unauthorized expedition and to join his Vicksburg forces.

In one of the rare ship-to-ship duels of the Civil War, C.S.S. Alabama sank U.S.S. Hatteras off Galveston, Texas ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Hatteras_(1861) ). Hatteras, on blockade, had investigated a strange ship, only to be attacked and beaten by the superior guns of Alabama. C.S.S. Alabama, commanded by Captain Raphael Semmes ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raphael_Semmes ), sank U.S.S. Hatteras, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Homer C. Blake, after a heated and close night engagement some thirty miles off Galveston. "My men," reported Semmes, "handled their pieces with great spirit and commendable coolness, and the action was sharp and exciting while it lasted; which, however, was not very long, for in just thirteen minutes after firing the first gun, the enemy hoisted a light, and fired an off-gun, as a signal that he had been beaten. We at once withheld our fire, and such a cheer went up from the brazen throats of my fellows, as must have astonished even a Texan, if he had heard it." Hatteras was severely punished, whereas damage to Alabama was so slight "that there was not a shot-hole which it was necessary to plug, to enable us to continue our cruise; nor was there a rope to be spliced." Hatteras went down in 9 1/2 fathoms, Alabama saving all hands. Other Union ships in the Galveston area steamed out in vain in chase of the raider. Semmes observed: "There was now as hurried a saddling of steeds for the pursuit as there had been in the chase of the young Lochinvar, and with as little effect, for by the time the steeds were given the spur, the Alabama was distant a hundred miles or more."

There was fighting at Lowry’s Ferry, Tennessee; Wood Creek, Missouri; and an engagement at Hartville, Missouri where Marmaduke’s Confederates retreated. Above Memphis on the Mississippi River a small group of Confederates surprised, captured, and burned U.S.S. Grampus No 2 laden with a large cargo of coal, and later burned her at Mound City, Arkansas. U.S.S. Matthew Vassar, commanded by Acting Master Hugh H. Savage, captured schooner Florida off Little River Inlet, South Carolina, with cargo of salt.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:30 pm 
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January 12, 1863 Monday
The third session of the First Confederate Congress gathered at Richmond and received a message on the state of the Confederacy from President Davis. He optimistically reviewed the military situation, pointing out the halting of Federals in Virginia, at Vicksburg, and in Tennessee. He then went into a long review of foreign relations and the hopes for recognition of the Confederacy. Speaking of the Emancipation Proclamation, Davis said it meant the extermination of the Negro race and encouraged mass assassination of their masters. He called it proof of the “true nature of the designs” of the Republican party. Davis asked for financial legislation, revision of the draft-exemption laws, and relief to citizens suffering war damage.

There was a skirmish at Lick Creek near Helena, Arkansas. Maj Gen John E. Wood assumed command of the Federal Department of the East.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2013 9:05 pm 
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Location: USA
January 13, 1863 Tuesday
A Federal expedition from Helena operated up the White River until the nineteenth, capturing St Charles, Clarendon, Devall’s Bluff, and Des Arc, Arkansas. At the same time there was a Union reconnaissance from Nashville to the Harpeth River and Cumberland River Shoals, and another from Murfreesboro to Nolensville and Versailles, Tennessee. There was a skirmish at Carthage, Missouri and a Union expedition from Yorktown to West Point, Virginia. At the Harpeth Shoals on the Cumberland in Tennessee, U.S. gunboat Sidell surrendered to Confederate troops under Joseph Wheeler. Three transports with wounded troops were also seized. The wounded were put on board one vessel and allowed to go on, while the other boats were burned. U.S.S. Currituck, commanded by Acting Master Linnekin, captured schooner Hampton at Dividing Creek, Virginia. The day before, Linnekin destroyed the salt works at Dividing Creek, works that had been "extensively engaged" in supplying Richmond with the important item.

Joint Army-Navy expedition from Memphis on board U.S.S. General Bragg, commanded by Lieutenant Joshua Bishop, destroyed buildings at Mound City, Arkansas, in reprisal for Confederate attacks on river steamers. Bishop reported: "Ascertained that there was quite a force of guerrillas in the neighborhood, who intended destroying steamers; that their rendezvous was at Mound City, Marion, and Hopefield. . . . At 9 a.m. left Bradley's Landing and proceeded to Mound City, firing shells at intervals into the woods, as it was supposed there were guerrillas thereabouts. At 10 landed at Mound City and disembarked the troops. The infantry made prisoners of several citizens, who had been harboring guerrillas. . . ."

Federal officials formally authorized the raising of Negro troops for the South Carolina Volunteer Infantry to be commanded by Col Thomas Wentworth Higginson. U.S.S. Columbia ran aground off North Carolina. Efforts to float her failed, and the vessel was captured and burned by Confederates. Daniel Ullmann, USA, was appointed to Brigadier General.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2013 7:05 pm 
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Location: USA
January 14, 1863 Wednesday
Joint Army-Navy forces, including U.S.S. Kinsman, Estrella, Calhoun, and Diana, under Lieutenant Commander Thomas McK. Buchanan, attacked Confederate defenses in Bayou Teche, below Franklin, Louisiana. Vigorous prosecution of the action by the naval vessels forced withdrawal of the Southern defenders and permitted removal of the formidable obstructions sunk in an effort to halt the ships. Gunboat C.S.S. Cotton, commanded by Lieutenant Edward W. Fuller, engaged the attacking force, but was compelled to withdraw, subsequently being set afire and destroyed by her crew to prevent capture. During the engagement, a torpedo exploded under U.S.S. Kinsman, commanded by Acting Lieutenant George Wiggin, unshipping her rudder. Lieutenant Commander Buchanan was killed by shore fire.

Joint expedition under Lieutenant Commander John G. Walker and Brigadier General Willis A. Gorman, including gunboats U.S.S. Baron De Kalb and Cincinnati with two Army transports in tow, arrived at St. Charles, Arkansas, on the White River in a move to follow up the advantage gained by the Fort Hindman victory. The commanders discovered that the Confederates had abandoned their position and withdrawn up river on board Blue Wing. While Cincinnati remained at St. Charles, Baron De Kalb proceeded up the White River in pursuit.

U.S.S. Columbia, commanded by Lieutenant Joseph P. Couthouy, ran aground on the coast of North Carolina. High winds and heavy seas aborted initial attempts to get her off, and by the 17th, when the weather moderated, Columbia was in Confederate hand's. She was destroyed by fire and Couthouy and some 11 other crew members were taken prisoner.

Confederate Gen E. Kirby Smith was assigned to command the Army of the Southwest.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1863
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2013 9:07 pm 
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Location: Panhandle of Texas
Ned, thanks again for starting this thread and keeping it up. It always amazes me just how much was going on most every day.

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General Mark Nelms
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