ACWGC
* ACWGC     * Dpt. of Records       * CSA HQ    * VMI    * Join CSA    
   * Union HQ    * UMA    * Join Union     ACWGC Memorial
CSA Armies:    ANV    AotW
Union Armies:    AotT     AotC      AotP      AotS     Union Army Forums
     Link Express
American Civil War Books, Magazines and Games for sale (See other items)
Club Forums:     NWC    CCC     Home Pages:     NWC    CCC    ACWGC
It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 4:25 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 372 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Fri Dec 19, 2014 6:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 20, 1864 Tuesday
The Federal left at Savannah, Georgia moved slowly to cut off Hardee’s escape route across the Savannah River into South Carolina, but they did not succeed. Hardee, urged by Beauregard and others to pull out, finally did. Without opposition, he headed northward toward concentration with other Confederate units. Hardee left behind some 250 heavy guns and large amounts of cotton, but, with an ingenious pontoon bridge of 30 rice flats, he managed to evacuate all his 10,000 troops. Nevertheless, the loss of the important port city was a severe blow to the Confederates psychologically. The only fighting was a skirmish near Pocotaligo Road, South Carolina.

Thomas’ troops, following up Hood’s retreat in Tennessee, constructed a floating bridge over Rutherford Creek and pushed on for Columbia. There they found the bridges destroyed and the enemy across the Duck River. Some skirmishing occurred near Columbia. Federals of Stoneman’s command captured and destroyed salt works in and around Saltville, Virginia. In addition, there was an engagement at Poplar Point, North Carolina. A Federal expedition from Cape Girardeau and Dallas, Missouri to Cherokee Bay, Arkansas and the St Francis River lasted until Jan 4. Small boats from the Union Navy tried to clear out torpedoes or mines at Rainbow Bluff, North Carolina and often engaged in skirmishing. John McAurthur, USA, is appointed to Major General.

President Davis expressed considerable concern to Beauregard, noting that the enemy was concentrating against Wilmington. He had left the decisions to evacuate Savannah and Charleston to Beauregard.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Sat Dec 20, 2014 6:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 21, 1864 Wednesday
Federal troops, finding no opposition, occupied Savannah, Georgia with John W. Geary’s division of the Twentieth Corps leading the march. Hardee’s escape was a great disappointment to Sherman but he covered it up well in his writings. Historians later criticized Sherman for leaving an escape route open, but, on the other hand, Hardee had been watching carefully and would have evacuated whenever the safety valve was in danger of being closed. Hood’s suffering Army of Tennessee continued its march southward from Columbia toward Pulaski, Tennessee leaving a rear guard behind. Thomas’ following force was plagued by weariness and swollen streams. The Union forces under Stoneman at Saltville, Virginia began to retire after their successful raid. A Federal expedition moved out from Memphis to attack the Mobile and Ohio Railroad; there also was a skirmish at Franklin Creek, Mississippi. The Congress of the United States set up the new grade of Vice-Admiral with Rear Admiral Farragut in mind for the promotion. Blockade runner Owl, under Commander Maffitt, departed Wilmington through the Federal blockaders with large cargo of cotton. Owl, owned by the Confederate government, was one of several blockade runners commanded by Southern naval officers.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Sun Dec 21, 2014 4:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 22, 1864 Thursday
At Savannah Gen Sherman sent his famous message to President Lincoln: “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 25,000 bales of cotton.” Sherman himself had just arrived at Savannah. He had been at Port Royal, South Carolina on military business when Savannah was evacuated. The Federal troops went to work on the defenses, replenishing their supplies and reorganizing their army. Meanwhile, Hardee’s retreating Confederates headed northward in South Carolina. Hood’s rear guard and Thomas’ pursuing force skirmished on the Duck River near Columbia, Tennessee. Another skirmish erupted on Franklin Creek, Mississippi. James Edward Harrison, CSA, and John Doby Kennedy, CSA, are appointed to Brigadier General. Major General Frederick Steele, USA, is relieved of command of the Federal Department of Arkansas and Major General Joseph J. Reynolds, USA, assumes command.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 7:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 23, 1864 Friday
The Federal fleet from Fort Monroe, intending to attack Fort Fisher near Wilmington, North Carolina had encountered very heavy seas and storms off Cape Hatteras and had been badly scattered. By now the battered vessels had arrived at the Beaufort rendezvous. Gen Benjamin F. Butler was in personal command of the two army divisions, numbering some 6500 men. David D. Porter commanded the fleet. Butler had planned to explode an old hulk loaded with 215 tons of powder near the fort, predicting that it would destroy it and the garrison. The powder boat was set off right enough, but it caused no damage to friend or foe. This was the first fiasco of an expedition which had been plagued by mistakes, storms, dissensions, and Gen Butler from the start. Elsewhere, a skirmish at Warfield’s near Columbia, Tennessee marked the continuing operations of Hood’s rear guard and Thomas’ pursuing forces. A two-day Federal expedition operated from Baton Rouge to Clinton, Louisiana. U.S.S. Acacia, commanded by Acting Master William Barrymore, captured blockade running British steamer Julia off Alligator Creek, South Carolina, with cargo of cotton.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 7:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 24, 1864 Saturday
Naval forces under the command of Rear Admiral Porter and Army units under Major General Butler launched an unsuccessful attack against Fort Fisher. Transports carrying Butler's troops had retired to Beaufort in order to avoid the anticipated effects of the explosion of the powder boat Louisiana, and fleet units had assembled in a rendezvous area 12 miles from the fort. At daylight on 24 December, the huge fleet got underway, formed in line of battle before the formidable Confederate works, and commenced a furious bombardment. The staunch Southern defenders, 500 men under the command of Colonel William Lamb, were driven from their guns and into the bombproofs of Fort Fisher, but managed to return the Federal fire from a few of their heavy cannon. Transports carrying the Union soldiers did not arrive from Beaufort until evening; too late for an assault that day. Accordingly, Porter withdrew his ships, intending to renew the attack the next day. Most of the casualties resulted from the bursting of five 100-pounder Parrott guns on board five different ships. By taking shelter the defenders, too, suffered few casualties, despite the heavy bombardment.

On the Tennessee front skirmishing occurred at Lynnville and Richland Creek, but the primary operations following the Battle of Nashville were over. In Arkansas Federals scouted from Pine Bluff to Richland and a skirmish broke out near Fort Smith. President Davis wrote Gen E. Kirby Smith, commanding the Trans-Mississippi Department, that he greatly regretted troops had not been sent east to aid in Tennessee and he again asked for such men.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:26 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 25, 1864 Sunday
Nearly 60 warships continued the Federal bombardment of Fort Fisher, easily hitting the parapets and traverses of the sand-built fort while troops landed north of the works, near Flag Pond Battery. Naval gunfire kept the garrison largely pinned down and away from their guns as Butler landed about 2,000 men who advanced toward the land face of the fort.

Meanwhile, the Admiral attempted to find a channel through New Inlet in order to attack the forts from Cape Fear River. When Commander Guest, U.S.S. Iosco and a detachment of double-ender gunboats encountered a shallow bar over which they could not pass, Porter called on the indomitable Lieutenant Cushing, hero of the Albemarle destruction, to sound the channel in small boats, buoying it for the ships to pass through. Under withering fire from the forts, even the daring Cushing was forced to turn back, one of his boats being cut in half by a Confederate shell.

Late in the afternoon, Army skirmishers advanced to within yards of the fort, supported by heavy fire from Union vessels. Lieutenant Aeneas Armstrong, CSN, inside Fort Fisher, later described the bombardment: "The whole of the interior of the fort, which consists of sand, merlons, etc., was as one eleven-inch shell bursting. You can now inspect the works and walk on nothing but iron." Union Army commanders, however, considered the works too strongly defended to be carried by assault with the troops available, and the soldiers began to reembark. Some 700 troops were left on the beaches as the weather worsened. They were protected by gunboats under Captain Glisson, U.S.S. Santiago de Cuba, who had lent continuous close support to the landing. By 27 December the last troops were embarked; the first major attack on Fort Fisher head failed. Confederate reinforcements under General R. F. Hoke were in Wilmington and arrived at Confederate Point just after Union forces departed. The Army transports returned to Hampton Roads to prepare for a second move on the Confederate bastion, while Porter's fleet remained in the Wilmington-Beaufort area and continued sporadic bombardment in an effort to prevent repair of the fort.

Fort Fisher still stood active at the entrance to the Cape Fear River. The Confederates realized this would not be the last attempt, but at the moment they had been victorious. For the Federals it was an ignominious failure, resulting in violent charges and countercharges between Butler and Porter, Butler and army officers, Butler and nearly everyone else.

Hood’s Army of Tennessee reached Bainbridge on the Tennessee River. There were skirmishes at Richland Creek, and King’s or Anthony’s Hill or Devil’s Gap, and White’s Station, Tennessee. Other action included an engagement at Verona, Mississippi and a skirmish at Rocky Creek Church, Georgia. Price’s Confederate command, still retreating from Missouri, reached Laynesport, Arkansas.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2014 6:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 26, 1864 Monday
Hood and the Army of Tennessee began crossing the Tennessee River at Bainbridge, Tennessee. This virtually ended the campaign, although there was a skirmish at Sugar Creek, Tennessee. Otherwise activity was confined to scouting by the Federals in northern Virginia, and an expedition until Jan 1 against Indians in central Arizona Territory. President Lincoln writes to thank General William T. Sherman and "your whole army" for "your Christmas gift—the capture of Savannah [Georgia]." Lincoln confesses, "I was anxious, if not fearful" when he learned of Sherman's plan to take Savannah, "but feeling that you were the better judge, and remembering that 'nothing risked, nothing gained' I did not interfere." Lincoln concludes, "But what next? I suppose it will be safer if I leave Gen. [Ulysses S.] Grant and yourself to decide." President Lincoln gives Christmas reception at White House.

Blockade runner Chameleon, formerly the dread raider C.S.S. Tallahassee, under the command of Lieutenant Wilkinson, slipped out of Wilmington amid the confusion in the aftermath of the first attack on Fort Fisher. In Bermuda, Chameleon loaded badly needed foodstuffs for the Confederate armies, but by the time Wilkinson could get her back to Wilmington in January, the port had already fallen.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2014 7:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 27, 1864 Tuesday
The Army of Tennessee completed crossing the Tennessee River at Bainbridge, Tennessee and headed toward Tupelo, Mississippi. Skirmishes broke out at Decatur, Alabama; and Okolona, Mississippi; while scouting continued around Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Shortly after midnight a boat crew under the command of Acting Ensign N. A. Blume from U.S.S. Virginia, cut out schooner Belle in Galveston harbor with cargo of cotton. Belle was at anchor only some 400 yards from Confederate guard boat Lecompte when Blume's party boldly boarded and sailed her out of the harbor.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2014 10:51 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 28, 1864 Wednesday
Skirmishing near Decatur, Alabama and a fight at Egypt, Mississippi marked the winter day. In Washington President Lincoln asked Grant “what you now understand of the Wilmington expedition, present & prospective.” Grant replied that “The Wilmington expedition has proven a gross and culpable failure…. Who is to blame I hope will be known.”

U.S.S. Kanawha, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Taylor, forced an unidentified blockade running sloop ashore near Caney Creek, Texas, and destroyed her.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2014 7:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 29, 1864 Thursday
In the fading Franklin-Nashville Campaign light skirmishing occurred at Hillsborough and Pond Springs, Alabama. C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, captured and destroyed bark Delphine in the Indian Ocean with cargo of rice. Delphine was Waddell's last capture of the year and ninth prize in eight weeks.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Mon Dec 29, 2014 8:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 30, 1864 Friday
The Wilmington fiasco was causing repercussions in Washington; at the Cabinet meeting President Lincoln indicated Butler would be removed from command of the Army of the James. Francis Preston Blair, Sr, powerful Maryland political figure, wrote President Davis that he wished to visit Richmond “to explain the views I entertain in reference to the state of the affairs of our Country.” Although this visit would be unofficial he indicated that he wanted to explore the possibilities of peace. There was skirmishing near Caruthersville, Missouri and Leighton, Alabama. Pierce Manning Butler Young, CSA, is appointed to Major General and James Phillip Simms, CSA, to Brigadier General.

Determined to take Wilmington and close the South's last important harbor but dissatisfied with General Butler's leadership, Rear Admiral Porter strongly urged the General's removal from command. General Grant wrote Porter: "Please hold on where you are for a few days and I will endeavor to be back again with an increased force and without the former commander." Ships of Porter's squadron kept up a steady bombardment of Fort Fisher to restrict the erection of new works and the repair of the damaged faces of the fort.

U.S.S. Rattler, commanded by Acting Master Willets, parted her cables in a heavy gale, ran ashore, struck a snag and sank in the Mississippi River near Grand Gulf. Willets, after salvaging most of Rattler's supplies and armament, was forced to abandon his small paddle-wheeler, which was subsequently burned by Confederates.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1864
PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2014 12:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 22, 2001 8:03 pm
Posts: 2243
Location: USA
December 31, 1864 Saturday
The year came uneventfully to an end with skirmishing at Sharpsburg, Kentucky and affairs at Paint Rock Bridge and Russellville, Alabama. However, as usual, people everywhere were wondering about the future. U.S.S. Metacomet, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Jouett, captured schooner Sea Witch southeast of Galveston, Texas, with cargo of coffee and medicine.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


Top
 Profile Send private message E-mail  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 372 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Niall Murphy and 25 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: