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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Mar 16, 2015 7:40 pm 
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March 17, 1865 Friday
As an aftermath to Averasborough there was skirmishing in the area and at Falling Creek, North Carolina. A new theater of operations was about to open. Federal Maj Gen E.R.S. Canby ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Canby ) began maneuvering his some 32,000 men against Mobile, Alabama. One Federal force moved from Pensacola and another from the area of Mobile Point up the east side of Mobile Bay. About 2800 Confederates under Brig Gen R.L. Gibson ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randall_L._Gibson ) defend the city. Union scouting continued in the Shenandoah Valley from Winchester to Edenburg, Virginia. There was also a Northern expedition until Mar 20 from Pine Bluff to Bass’ Plantation, Arkansas.

Concerned over increasing sales of arms and munitions to Indians, President Lincoln directed that all persons detected in this commerce should be arrested and tried by military court-martial. In a speech to the 140th Indiana Regiment, Lincoln said, “Whenever [I] hear any one, arguing for slavery I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”

The following appointments are made to Brigadier General: Richard Montgomery Gano, CSA; Henry Gray, CSA; William Polk Hardeman, CSA; and Walter Paye Lane, CSA.

U.S.S. Quaker City, under Commander Spicer, captured blockade running schooner George Burkhart in the Gulf of Mexico with cargo of cotton, bound from Lavaca, Texas for Matamoras, Mexico.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 6:14 pm 
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March 18, 1865 Saturday
The Confederate Congress ended its session, which proved to be its last, in a fit of contention with President Davis. Many essential war measures were left unpassed, and for the last few days its main business had been to argue with the President over whether he or Congress had delayed action and was responsible for some of the difficulties facing the Confederacy. It was probably symptomatic of the need to blame someone for the fast-approaching and now nearly obvious disaster.

Johnston was attempting to concentrate against the Federals advancing toward Goldsborough, North Carolina. In the morning the left wing of two Northern corps under H.W. Slocum stood just south of Bentonville. Hampton’s Confederate cavalry kept Johnston posted. Howard’s right wing of Sherman’s army was to the south and east. The Confederates had about 20,000 troops, to 30,000 for Slocum and Kilpatrick. Overburdened with generals, Johnston’s army was makeshift in organization. However, he had to try to strike one column of the Federals at a time. He did not stand a chance against Sherman’s full army, which together with troops marching in from Wilmington totaled about 100,000. The Battle of Bentonville really opened when Hampton’s cavalry skirmished along Mingo Creek, at Bushy Swamp, and near Benton’s Cross Roads, holding off the Union advance units of Slocum. During the night Johnston and Hampton conferred on the attack for the next day.

Elsewhere, skirmishes occurred at Livingston, Tennessee; near Dranesville, Virginia; and on the Amite River, Louisiana. A Union expedition from Fort Gibson to Little River and Hillabee, Indian Territory operated for the rest of March. At Mobile Bay some seventeen hundred Federal troops advanced from Dauphin Island on the west side of the bay to deceive the enemy as to which side would be attacked. The main effort was to be on the east. (The Yankees on the west side withdrew on Mar 20, their mission of deception accomplished.)

Thomas James Churchill, CSA, and John Sappington Marmaduke, CSA, are appointed to Major General. Richard Waterhouse, CSA, and Charles Ewing, USA, are appointed to Brigadier General.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Wed Mar 18, 2015 11:52 pm 
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March 19, 1865 Sunday
Gen Sherman did not expect an attack and departed Slocum’s left wing during the morning to go to Howard on the right. But the Federals had only just resumed their march when they ran into the waiting Confederates south of Bentonville, South Carolina. At first they did not seem to be a serious obstacle to Slocum, but by afternoon he was being pressed. However, some mix-up occurred delaying the Confederates. When the drive was made the Union troops were solidly entrenched. Hardee, A.P. Stewart, and D.H. Hill led their men. At first the Confederates crashed through the Federal breastworks, partially demoralizing one section of the Northern force and routing the left. Troops of Jefferson C. Davis, however, withstood the continuing Southern attack, and other Federal units came in to stem the advance. The battle lasted until after dark. Three main Confederate assaults were beaten off. In the evening the Confederates pulled back to their starting points and both sides spent the night preparing positions ( http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/bentonville.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bentonville ).

Meanwhile, some twenty miles to the east, Howard’s Union right wing hurried toward Bentonville. Over the Neuse River, Schofield’s advancing forces skirmished at the Neuse River Bridge near Goldsborough and near Cox’s Bridge.

The cavalry of Phil Sheridan reached White House on the Pamunkey River after wrecking the Virginia Central Railroad and the James River Canal in its successful march from Winchester to join Grant’s army near Petersburg. Skirmishing at Celina, Tennessee and Welaka and Saunders, Florida completed the day. Brigadier General Thomas Kilby Smith ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kilby_Smith ), USA, assumes command of the Federal District of South Alabama.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Thu Mar 19, 2015 8:33 pm 
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March 20, 1865 Monday
Federal reinforcements from Howard’s right wing arrived by daybreak at Bentonville, North Carolina to relieve Slocum’s left wing. Wheeler’s Southern cavalry resisted the new advance. Some shifting of Confederate positions south of Bentonville was necessary and by late afternoon Sherman’s entire army was united in front and on both flanks of Johnston’s position. There was no heavy fighting but considerable skirmishing occurred.

George Stoneman and some 4,000 cavalry from Thomas’ army in Tennessee left Jonesborough, Tennessee to support Sherman in the Carolinas by carrying out wrecking operations. The Federal column cooperating with the main attack on Mobile moved toward that city from Pensacola, Florida. There were skirmishes in North Carolina near Falling Creek; in Georgia at Ringgold; in Arkansas at Talbot’s Ferry. Federal activities included a three-day expedition from Brashear City to Bayou Pigeon, Louisiana; a scout from Lexington, Missouri; scouting to Kabletown, Myerstown, and Myers’ Ford, West Virginia; a two-day scout from Winchester to Edenburg, Virginia; and yet another, lasting until the twenty-fifth, from Harper’s Ferry into Loudoun County, Virginia.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Fri Mar 20, 2015 10:04 pm 
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March 21, 1865 Tuesday
Sherman’s troops kept up the pressure on Johnston at Bentonville, North Carolina. The men of Maj Gen J.A. Mower moved from the far Union right around the Confederate left late in the afternoon and threatened the Mill Creek Bridge on Johnston’s retreat line. Counterattacks arrested the menace after considerable fighting. This ended the Battle of Bentonville, the last significant Confederate effort to halt Sherman’s advance. During the night Johnston ordered evacuation after reports that Schofield had taken Goldsborough. Casualties for the North totaled over 1500 and for the Confederates over 2600, many of whom were captured. Even if Slocum had been beaten, the Carolina Campaign could scarcely have had any other outcome. In truth, with nearly 100,000 Federals in North Carolina, at Goldsborough and in Sherman’s main army, there was little his opponent could have done. Otherwise the day saw only the start of a three-day Federal scout from Pine Bluff to Monticello, Arkansas.

President Davis wrote Gen Lee, concurring with him that Mobile should be held and “all the recent indications are that the purpose of the enemy is to cut off all communication with Richmond….”

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 7:24 pm 
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March 22, 1865 Wednesday
Yet another Federal offensive began, adding to those in North Carolina, at Mobile, and the continuing siege at Petersburg. The Union forces of James Harrison Wilson struck from the Tennessee River toward Selma, Alabama, one of the few centers left to the South. The raid was to be in conjunction with the Federal attack on Mobile to the south of Selma. In North Carolina skirmishing flared at Mill Creek, Hannah’s Creek, and Black Creek. Fighting also occurred near Patterson’s Creek Station, West Virginia; at Celina, Tennessee; and Stephenson’s Mills, Missouri. At Bentonville Sherman checked his brief follow-up of the retreating Confederates of Johnston. He now issued orders to concentrate about Goldsborough. Theodore Washington Brevard, CSA, is appointed to Brigadier General. Confident of the security of his position, Sherman could leave his soldiers for a few days and take steamer Russia to City Point and the meeting with Lincoln, Grant, and Porter.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sun Mar 22, 2015 8:23 pm 
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March 23, 1865 Thursday
Sherman and Schofield joined at Goldsborough, practically on the schedule set by Sherman. The Federal force of some 90,000 to 100,000 men now dominated North Carolina. Immediately work began to reequip the army after its long marches. The Carolina Campaign was all but over – a triumphant journey. It was true there had been no opposition of any size until the last few days. Johnston placed what force he had on the two roads he thought Sherman would take toward Virginia, through Raleigh or through Weldon. This position would also make junction with the Army of Northern Virginia practicable should Lee retire from Petersburg. The Confederates now had a desperately needed breathing spell to recuperate. There was another skirmish at Cox’s Bridge on the Neuse River, North Carolina. On other fronts skirmishing broke out near Dannelly’s Mills, Alabama and a Union scout probed for two days from Donaldsonville to Bayou Goula, Louisiana.

President Lincoln left Washington for City Point, Virginia and Grant’s headquarters, accompanied by Mrs Lincoln and Tad. It was to be a combination vacation and conference with Grant concerning what all could see would be a determined and concentrated effort to end the war.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 6:52 pm 
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March 24, 1865 Friday
For the Confederates it was a day and night of preparation. John B. Gordon had been assigned to lead an attack the next day at Fort Stedman on the Federal right at Petersburg. If the siege line could be broken here the indispensable supply line to City Point might be cut. Then perhaps Grant would shorten his lines and Lee could assist Johnston. At least a successful assault would help Lee in his possible retreat from Richmond.

Near Moccasin Creek, North Carolina there was a skirmish; near Dannelly’s Mills and near Evergreen, Alabama, affairs; near Rolla, Missouri, an affair; and a Union scout from Bayou Boeuf to Bayou Chemise, Louisiana. U.S.S. Quaker City, under Commander Spicer, captured blockade runner Cora with cargo of lumber off Brazos Santiago, Texas.

The vessel containing President Lincoln and his party arrived at Fort Monroe. Confederate ironclad raider Stonewall put out from Ferrol, Spain. Two Union wooden frigates refused to engage Stonewall. Commodore T. T. Craven was subsequently court-martialed and found remiss in his duties for failing to engage Stonewall. Serving as President of this court was Vice Admiral Farragut and sitting as a member was Commodore John A. Winslow who had sunk the Confederate raider Alabama. The court sentenced Craven to two years suspension on leave pay. Secretary Welles refused to approve what he regarded as a "paid vacation" for an officer who had been found guilty and instead he restored Craven to duty.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:32 pm 
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March 25, 1865 Saturday
Southerners who said they were deserters showed up about 3AM at the Union lines near Fort Stedman on the east side of the Petersburg, Virginia siege fortifications. In fact, they were advance men aiming at sabotage when, an hour later, Maj Gen John B. Gordon ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_Gordon ) launched his massive attack at Fort Stedman and surrounding entrenchments ( http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/fortstedman.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Stedman ). The Confederates quickly overwhelmed the opposition and rushed into the fort, completely surprising the Federal garrison. Several batteries and other trenches were taken until about three fourths of a mile of Union position was in Southern hands. Small columns pressed on toward City Point and the Federal supply railroad, one of the first specially built military railroads in history. But, like so many Confederate attacks late in the war, it lost momentum and there was not the strength to exploit and maintain the momentary advantage. Union troops rallied, changed position, and forced the attackers back to Fort Stedman. About seven-thirty a Federal division assaulted the fort and Gordon withdrew, although not all the Confederates could get back to their own lines. By seven forty-five the Federal line was restored and the entire attack defeated. It had never been more than a forlorn hope, and now little remained except disheartening withdrawal from Petersburg and Richmond. Gen Lee rode back from the field, careworn and dejected. Against less than 1500 Federal casualties, Lee lost some 4000, many of them prisoners.

After a trying march due to drenching rains, the Federal troops neared Spanish Fort and the fortifications of Mobile, Alabama on the east side of the bay. By Mar 27 the investment would be complete. Confederate Brig Gen R.L. Gibson tried to organize his 2800 men to oppose Canby’s 32,000. Despite strong earthworks around the city it was manifestly impossible for the South to hold out long without help.

Otherwise there was the usual roll of skirmishes – on the Deer Park Road, Alabama; at Cotton Creek, Mitchell’s or Canoe Creek, and Escambia River, Florida; Brawley Forks, Tennessee; Glasgow, Kentucky; Watkins House and Fort Fisher, Virginia. Two Federal expeditions operated from Brashear City, one to Indian Bend, Louisiana and the other to Oyster Bayou, Louisiana.

President Lincoln visited Gen Grant at City Point, Virginia. Lincoln then took the military railroad to the Petersburg lines, where he rode horseback over part of the Fort Stedman battlefield.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 10:49 pm 
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March 26, 1865 Sunday
The cavalry command of Phil Sheridan crossed the James River and headed toward a junction with Grant at Petersburg, Virginia. This would give Grant an even larger force with which to extend the lines and thus further thin out Lee’s already numerically inadequate defenders. Lee wrote President Davis of the failure at Fort Stedman the day before: “I fear now it will be impossible to prevent a junction between Grant and Sherman, nor do I deem it prudent that this army should maintain its position until the latter shall approach too near.” Lee was preparing now to give up Petersburg and Richmond and pull back westward to attempt to join Johnston in North Carolina.

On the Mobile, Alabama front skirmishing erupted as Union troops pushed in nearer Spanish Fort. Other skirmishing occurred at Muddy Creek, Alabama and Federals entered Pollard. In Kentucky there was a skirmish in Bath County and a four-day Union expedition in Louisiana from Bonnet Carre to the Amite River.

President Lincoln reviewed troops and watched Sheridan’s men cross the James River while on his junket to the main fighting front at Petersburg. Grant conferred with Sheridan and prepared instructions for the start of the coming campaign.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Thu Mar 26, 2015 10:10 pm 
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March 27, 1865 Monday
Aboard River Queen at City Point, Virginia, President Lincoln conferred with Genls Grand and Sherman and Adm Porter. Sherman had come up from Goldsborough, North Carolina where his army was concentrated. The first day’s talk, largely social, included an account of Sherman’s campaign. A three-day Union scout moved from Winchester to Woodstock, Virginia. In the Mobile Campaign one Federal column reached Canoe Station, Alabama. Major General Alfred H. Terry ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Terry ), USA, is assigned command of the newly Federal reorganized 10th Army Corps.

Captain T. J. Page, C.S.S. Stonewall, wrote Commander Bulloch in England that he would sail from Lisbon, Portugal, to Teneriffe and then to Nassau where his subsequent movements "must depend upon the intelligence I may receive. . . ." That evening, U.S.S. Niagara and Sacramento, which had followed Stonewall from Coruña, Spain, entered Lisbon. The Confederate ram, however, was able to put to sea the next day without interference because international law required the two Union ships to remain in port for 24 hours after Stonewall had departed.

Combined Army-Navy operations, the latter commanded by Rear Admiral Thatcher, aimed at capturing the city of Mobile commenced. The object was Spanish Fort, located near the mouth of the Blakely River and was the key to the city's defenses. Six tinclads and supporting gun¬boats steamed up the Blakely River to cut the fort's communications with Mobile while the army began to move against the fort's outworks. The river had been thickly sown with torpedoes which necessitated sweeping operations ahead of the advancing ironclads. These efforts, directed by Commander Pierce Crosby of U.S.S. Metacomet, netted 150 torpedoes. Nevertheless, a number of the Confederate weapons eluded the Union--with telling results. In the next five days three Northern warships would be sunk in the Blakely.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Fri Mar 27, 2015 10:19 pm 
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March 28, 1865 Tuesday
Shifting of troops by the Federals at Petersburg marked preparations for the move to begin March 29. Meanwhile, a small expedition operated until April 11 from Deep Bottom, Virginia to Weldon, North Carolina. Skirmishing took place near Snow Hill, North Carolina; at Boone, North Carolina, involving Stoneman’s Union cavalry column moving in from the west; near Elyton, Alabama with Wilson’s cavalry moving into the northern part of the state; and at Germantown, Tennessee. Until March 30 a Federal expedition operated from Fort Pike, Louisiana to Bay St Louis, Mississippi.

Genls Grant and Sherman, along with Adm Porter, continued their conversations with President Lincoln on River Queen off City Point, Virginia. The generals detailed their plans and pointed out that one more major campaign would be needed. Sherman later said the President told them he was ready, once the Rebels laid down their weapons and resumed civil pursuits, to grant them all their rights as citizens of the United States. Just how specifically Lincoln revealed his reconstruction plans is hard to say. Sherman, however, claimed these talks were the basis for his later terms with Gen Johnston, which were turned down by the Federal government and President Johnson.

In a letter to his daughter, Gen Lee said, “Genl Grant is evidently preparing for something & is marshalling & preparing his troops for some movement, which is not yet disclosed….”

U.S.S. Milwaukee, commanded by Lieutenant Commander James H. Gillis, struck a torpedo in the Blakely River, Alabama, while dropping downstream after shelling a Southern transport which was attempting to supply Spanish Fort. Just as Gillis returned to the area that had been swept for torpedoes and "supposed the danger from torpedoes was past," he "felt a shock and saw at once that a torpedo had exploded on the port side, of the vessel . . . ." Milwaukee's stern went under within three minutes but the forward compartments did not fill for almost an hour, enabling the sailors to save most of their belongings. Although the twin turreted monitor sank, no lives were lost.

U.S.S. Niagara, under Commodore T. T. Craven, was fired upon by one of the forts in the harbor of Lisbon, Portugal. In a report to James E. Harvey, U.S. Minister Resident in Lisbon, Craven stated: "With view of shifting her berth farther up the river, so as to be nearer the usual landing stairs, at about 3:15 p.m. the Niagara was got underway and was about being turned head upstream when three shots were fired in rapid succession directly at her from Castle Belem." Portugal later apologized for the incident.

Secretary Welles advised Commodore Sylvanus W. Godon that he had been appointed an acting Rear Admiral and was to command the Brazil Squadron. Welles' letter was a significant commentary on the progress of the war afloat: "It is proposed to reestablish the Brazil Squadron, as circumstances now admit of the withdrawal of many of the vessels that have been engaged in the blockade and in active naval operations and sending them on foreign service . . . ."

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2015 4:49 pm 
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March 29, 1865 Wednesday
The Northern Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James, together numbering about 125,000, were on the move against Lee at Petersburg and Richmond. On the lengthy, extended line from north of the James River to well west of Petersburg, Lee could muster less than half the Yankee manpower. Lee had been collecting materiel and food and waiting for passable roads before pulling out in early April to join Johnston. Now the Federals threatened him on his weakly held right flank and might well cut off his retreat route westward. Lee sent George E. Pickett and Fitzhugh Lee to the right, near the Five Forks area, where he expected the Federal flanking movement. There was an engagement at Lewis’ Farm near Gravelly Run, and skirmishing at the junction of the Quaker and Boydton roads and on the Vaughan Road near Hatcher’s Run. Rain in the evening slowed the Union advance. Sheridan’s cavalry rode out westward toward Dinwiddie Court House south of Five Forks while two supporting Federal infantry corps, the Fifth under G.K. Warren and the Second under A.A. Humphreys, marched to aid Sheridan. The intent was to force Lee out of his entrenched lines. The sharpest fighting occurred near the junction of the Boydton and Quaker roads, where Warren’s men forced the enemy back. The day’s movements plainly indicated Grant’s strategy and the danger to the Confederates in the siege lines.

Stoneman’s Federal cavalry fought a skirmish at Wilkesborough, North Carolina in their move from east Tennessee. The Yankees continued to converge on Mobile defense lines. There was skirmishing in southwest Missouri and a Union scout until April 2 from Waynesville, Missouri. Other skirmishing occurred at Blackwater River, Kentucky and Mosely Hall, North Carolina. A Federal scout operated from Stephenson’s Depot, Virginia to Smithfield, West Virginia. Thomas Maley Harris, USA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

Sherman had gone back to Goldsborough, North Carolina. President Lincoln continued on at City Point, inquiring of Grant and others how things looked as to the new movement. Gen Lee kept Richmond posted on the enemy’s movements at Petersburg.

U.S.S. Osage, commanded by Lieutenant Commander William M. Gimble, upped anchor and got underway inside the bar at the Blakely River, Alabama. Gamble was trying to avoid colliding with U.S.S. Winnebago, which was drifting alongside in a strong breeze. Suddenly a torpedo exploded under the monitor's bow, and, Gamble reported, "the vessel immediately commenced sinking." Osage lost four men and had eight wounded in the explosion. She was the third ship to be sunk in the Blakely during March and the second in two days as torpedo warfare cost the North dearly even though its ships controlled waters near Mobile.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2015 8:09 pm 
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March 30, 1865 Thursday
Pelting rains bogged down most of the Federal advance on the Petersburg front, where Sheridan, at Dinwiddie Court House, was ready to move with infantry assistance against the Confederate right flank. There was skirmishing, however, on the line of Hatcher’s Run and Gravelly Run, and near Five Forks. Humphreys did continue the advance of his Second Corps, pressing up close to the enemy entrenchments along Hatcher’s Run, while Warren’s Fifth Corps moved ahead to occupy a line toward Gravelly Run. Meanwhile, the Confederates of Pickett and Fitzhugh Lee consolidated near Five Forks, where Fitzhugh Lee repulsed Merritt of Sheridan’s cavalry. The Confederate moves, of course, sorely weakened Lee on other parts of his line. Reconnaissance near Petersburg by Federals ascertained it was practicable for the Federals to assault.

Union cavalry of James Harrison Wilson in northern Alabama skirmished at Montevallo with troops under Forrest’s general command. There also was an affair near Patterson’s Creek, West Virginia and a four-day Federal expedition from Baton Rouge, Louisiana to Clinton and the Comite River.

President Lincoln at City Point said he should be back in Washington “and yet I dislike to leave without seeing nearer to the end of General Grant’s present movement.” In Richmond President Davis wrote a friend that “Faction has done much to cloud our prospects and impair my power to serve the country.”

Lieutenant Charles W. Read took command of the ram C.S.S. William H. Webb in the Red River, Louisiana. Read reported to Secretary Mallory that he found the ship "without a single gun on board, little or no crew, no fuel, and no small arms, save a few cutlasses." Characteristically, the enterprising officer obtained a 30 pound Parrott rifle from General Kirby Smith and readied William H. Webb for her bold dash out of the Red River, intended to take her down the Mississippi some 300 miles, past New Orleans, and out to sea.

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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 7:15 pm 
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March 31, 1865 Friday
The heavy rain ended in the morning and the action began. Somewhat over 10,000 Confederates were arrayed against more than 50,000 Federals on the western part of the Petersburg line. Sheridan pressed forward from Dinwiddie Court House with a portion of his troops. Confederates drove them back toward the main body at the Court House, a tactical defeat for the Union. However, during the night Pickett realized Sheridan and Warren’s Fifth Corps were too strong, so he pulled back toward Five Forks. Warren’s Fifth Corps also had its difficulties on the White Oak Road and there was fighting at Hatcher’s Run or Boydton Road, and Crow’s House. Warren’s task was to aid Sheridan against Pickett; Humphreys’ Second Corps was also ordered in support. Warren’s men, however, were able to repulse and turn back the enemy. It was the beginning of the operations that were to end only with the surrender of Lee, and later became the subject of many acrimonious controversies among Union generals and historians. The comparatively small actions of March 31 laid the scene for the first day of April.

In Alabama the Northern cavalry of James Harrison Wilson wrecked iron furnaces and collieries around Montevallo, Alabama. Skirmishing occurred nearby and at Six Mile Creek. Confederate opposition was too weak to prevent widespread destruction. At Mobile Federals were occupying nearby towns and drawing in their siege lines. Skirmishes broke out at Magnolia, Tennessee and at Gulley’s and Hookertown, North Carolina. About Agua Fria, New Mexico Territory, there were two days of minor operations. Major General John Bankhead Magruder ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_B._Magruder ), CSA, succeeds Major General John G. Walker ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_George_Walker ), CSA, in command of the Confederate District of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona.

St. Mary's, a 115 ton schooner out of St. Mary's, Maryland, loaded with an assorted cargo valued at $20,000, was boarded and captured off the Patuxent River in Chesapeake Bay by a Confederate raiding party led by Master John C. Braine, CSN. The disguised Southerners were in a yawl and had come alongside the schooner on the pretext that their craft was sinking. Braine took St. Mary's to sea where they captured a New York bound schooner J. B. Spafford. The latter prize was released after the raiders had placed St. Mary's crew on board her and had taken the crew members' personal effects. The Confederates indicated to their captives that their intention was to take St. Mary's to St. Marks, Florida, but they put into Nassau in April.

U.S.S. Iuka, commanded by Lieutenant William C. Rogers, captured blockade running British schooner Comus off the coast of Florida with cargo of cotton.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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