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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sat Jun 20, 2015 11:05 pm 
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June 21, 1865 Wednesday
Lewis E. Parsons was named provisional governor of Alabama by President Johnson. Brigadier General James C. Veatch, USA, is assigned command of the Federal forces in West Louisiana.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:19 pm 
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June 22, 1865 Thursday
C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, cruising off Cape Navarin, found "a current setting to the N.E. and soon after seeing blubber we concluded the whale vessels south of us were cutting out, and steam was ordered. This calculation was correct. Within an hour they sighted two American whalers which were the first spoken since entering the Bering Sea. Coming up on the two New Bedford whalers in close proximity, he captured and placed a prize crew on board William Thompson and then stood in pursuit of Euphrates. After a two hour chase , she was captured, stripped of supplies and set ablaze. Waddell then returned to William Thompson and subjected her to the same fate.

Waddell burned most of the ships captured in the northern seas. Earlier in his journal he had discussed the destruction of prizes.

According to the freighting for some ships one could simply "knock a hole in her bottom from in board below the water line and the vessel sinks rapidly and finally disappears leaving only a few pieces of plank floating over the great abyss which has closed over her."

"It frequently occurs that to destroy a prize, fire must be resorted to, and there is no escape from that ruthless element. However much it may be condemned, it is better than to leave a prize so disabled and injured as to be formidable enough to endanger the navigation of the ocean. Fire serves as a beacon to inform the sailor of danger, but it leaves a small portion of the vessel, the floor and the keel to float upon the surface of the water."

"To prepare a vessel for destruction by fire, first remove all living animals, take out all useful equipment which may be wanted, discover what combustibles are in her hold, such as tar, pitch, turpentine, and see to the removal of gunpowder. All of these things should be thrown into sea. Combustibles are then scattered throughout the vessel, bulkheads torn down and piled up in her cabins and forecastle. All hatches are opened and all halyards let go that the sails may hang loosely and the yards counter braced. Fire is then taken from the galley or cooking stove and deposited in various parts of her hold and about her deck."

"If she is very old she burns like tinder. This painful duty which sometimes became necessary would have been avoided had we been allowed to take our prizes into port for adjudication."

On this date, upon learning of the final collapse of the Confederacy, Master John C. Braine, CSN, took passage for Liverpool, England, from Kingston, Jamaica. On several occasions during the war Braine had led naval parties in the successful seizures of Federal merchantmen and quite likely would have been prosecuted for piracy had he been apprehended by the Federals. The schooner St. Mary's, which he seized in Chesapeake Bay and had sailed to Nassau, was abandoned in Kingston just prior to his booking passage for Liverpool. Previous to the St. Mary's incident, he had seized the steamers Chesapeake off Cape Cod on Dec 7, 1863 and the Roanoke off Havana on Sep 29, 1864 while leading Confederate naval parties masquerading as passengers.

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Jun 22, 2015 10:50 pm 
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June 23, 1865 Friday
President Johnson declared the Federal blockade of the Southern states, in existence since April, 1861, at an end. At Doaksville near Fort Towson in the Indian Territory, Cherokee leader Brig Gen Stand Watie surrendered the Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, and Osage Battalion to Lieut Col Asa Mathews. As the Indian general signed, with picturesque black hair falling to his shoulders, he represented the last formal submission of any sizable body of Confederate troops.

Rear Admiral Samuel F. DuPont died unexpectedly at the age of 61 while on a visit to Philadelphia. He had commanded the South Atlantic Squadron during the first two years of the war and had led the naval forces in the important capture of Port Royal by amphibious assault on 7 November 1861.

Lieutenant Commander Cushing received orders to U.S.S. Lancaster, flagship of Rear Admiral George F. Pearson, commanding the Pacific Squadron. Shortly after reporting on board the ship at San Francisco, the people of that city extended to Cushing the freedom of the city in recognition of his courageous and heroic war record. On five separate occasions he led daring raids and each time was successful in destroying a Confederate ship. The most famous of these was conducted 27 October 1864, when he sank the C.S.S. Albemarle with a spar torpedo. He also led one of the assaulting columns of sailors and Marines against the sea face of Fort Fisher on 15 January 1865.

C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, captured and burned at sea the ship General Williams near St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:58 pm 
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June 24, 1865 Saturday
Commercial restrictions were removed from states and territories west of the Mississippi River by President Johnson. Major General Henry W. Slocum, USA, is assigned command of the Federal Department of Mississippi.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 9:04 pm 
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June 25, 1865 Sunday
Secretary Welles ordered the further reduction of the Mississippi Squadron to 5 ships, and directed the abandonment of all the naval stations of the Mississippi Squadron, except that at Mound City, Illinois.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2015 8:16 pm 
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June 26, 1865 Monday
George Peabody Estey, USA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

Shortly after midnight C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, commenced a highly successful day of operations. At one thirty a.m. she sailed alongside three becalmed whalers. In short order Waddell put Nimrod, William C. Nye, and Catherine to the torch, ordered their crews into small boats to be towed astern of the raider, and set out in pursuit of three other sails sighted to the northward. He captured barks General Pike, Isabella, and Gipsey before noon, and, after making a cartel ship out of General Pike and bonding her, the other two whalers were burned. "Within forty-eight hours," Waddell wrote, "the Shenandoah has destroyed and ransomed property to the value of $253,500."

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 5:50 pm 
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June 27, 1865 Tuesday
Major General George G. Meade, USA, is assigned command of the Federal Military Division of the Atlantic with Major General Charles R. Woods, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Alabama; Major General John G. Foster, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Florida; Major General Samuel P. Carter, USA, assigned command of the Federal 23rd Army Corps, Florida; Major General James B. Steedman, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Georgia; and Major General John M. Schofield, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of North Carolina.

Major General Philip H. Sheridan, USA, is assigned command of the Federal Military Division of the Gulf with Major General Edward R. S. Canby, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Louisiana & Texas.

Major General William T. Sherman, USA, is assigned command of the Federal Military Division of the Mississippi with Major General Henry W. Slocum, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Mississippi; Major General John Pope, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of the Missouri; Major General Joseph J. Reynolds, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Arkansas; Major General John M. Palmer, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Kentucky; Major General Winfield Scott Hancock, USA, assigned command of the Federal Middle Department; Major General Joseph Hooker, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of the East; Major General Alfred H. Terry, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Virginia; and Major General Edward O. C. Ord, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of the Ohio.

Major General Henry W. Halleck, USA, is assigned command of the new Federal Military Division of the Pacific with Major General Irvin McDowell, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of California; Brigadier General George Wright, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of the Columbia; and Major General Christopher C. Augur, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Washington.

Major General George H. Thomas, USA, is assigned command of the Federal Military Division of Tennessee with Major General George Stoneman, USA, assigned command of the Federal Department of Tennessee.

William Henry Penrose, USA, is appointed to Brigadier General.

Commander Macomb, commanding the Union naval forces in Albemarle Sound, reported to the commander of the Atlantic Squadron that he had captured all the Confederate naval vessels in the Roanoke River. He took possession of the sternwheel steamer Cotton Plant, the screw steamer Egypt Mills, the unfinished gunboat Halifax, and one lighter. He also seized 99 bales of cotton. The two steamers had been privately owned at one time but had been taken over by the Confederate Navy during the latter stages of the war.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2015 6:02 pm 
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June 28, 1865 Wednesday
Brigadier General Robert B. Mitchell, USA, is assigned command of the new Federal District of Kansas.

This date marked the most successful single day C.S.S. Shenandoah enjoyed as a commerce raider during her long cruise that spanned 13 months and covered 58,000 miles, and during which Waddell often successfully followed his conviction that "nothing is to be gained if risk is not taken." Near the narrows of the Bering Strait, Lieutenant Waddell fell in with a rendezvous of eleven American whalers. The ship Brunswick of New Bedford had been stove in by an ice floe and the others had gathered either to render assistance or to bid on supplies and oil in the event the master decided to abandon ship and offer bargains. To insure that none escaped, Waddell entered the bay under the American flag and while five boats were being quickly armed and manned, he maneuvered the ship to a position in which the raider's guns commanded the whalers. As soon as the armed boats were away, the Confederate commander lowered the American flag and ran up the Stars and Bars. Ten of the whalers immediately struck their colors. The single exception was Favorite of New Haven whose flag remained at the gaff defended by her drunken master flourishing a harpoon gun. The resistance was shortlived as the whaler was carried by boarding without bloodshed. Waddell then bonded the ship James Murray and the bark Nile and placed his 336 prisoners on board for passage to San Francisco. The latter whaler was selected for this mission because her master had died, leaving a widow and two small children on board; "the poor widow had the remains of her husband on board preserved in whiskey". Waddell stripped the vessels of supplies, and recruited 9 men. He noted that their enlistment was "evidence that if they had heard any report of the military failure of the South, they considered it unreliable". Waddell put the torch to the ships Hillman, Nassau, Brunswick, Isaac Howland and barks Waverly, Martha, Favorite, Covington and Congress. Waddell records in his memoirs that "the horizon was illuminated with a fiery glare presenting a picture of indescribable grandeur, while the water was covered with black smoke mingled with flakes of fire". This field day against American commerce climaxed a highly successful cruise in which Shenandoah captured a total of 38 American vessels valued at $1,361,983.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Jun 29, 2015 6:13 pm 
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June 30, 1865 Friday
The military tribunal for the nine suspects in the Lincoln assassination plot returned its verdict: three of the nine, along with Mrs. Mary E. Surratt, will be hung in the prison yard of the penitentiary on July 7, 1865 -- Lewis Paine who made the unsuccessful assassination attempt on U. S. Secretary of State William Henry Seward; George A. Atzerodt who had been designated by Booth to murder U. S. Vice President Andrew Johnson; and David E. Herold who had accompanied Booth in his escape from the city. Michael O'Laughlin and Samuel B. Arnold, boyhood friends of Booth and conspirators in the actor's earlier plans to abduct U. S. President Abraham Lincoln and in his later plans to assassinate the government's top officials, were sentenced to life in prison. Another accomplice, Edward Spangler, stagehand at the Ford Theater was sentenced to six years in prison. Dr. Samuel Mudd, the physician who treated the injured Booth while he was fleeing Federal troops, was also sentenced to life in prison. The remaining two of the nine -- Ernest Hartman Richter, a cousin of Atzerodt, and Joao Celestino, a Portuguese sea captain -- were released without being brought to trial. An outcry went up over the decision to execute Mrs Surratt and several efforts were made to have the sentence changed but to no avail. ( http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/f ... count.html )

President Johnson named Benjamin F. Perry provisional governor of South Carolina.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2015 4:05 pm 
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July 1, 1865 Saturday
New Hampshire becomes the 21st state to ratify the 13th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution, which abolishes slavery.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2015 6:33 pm 
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July 5, 1865 Wednesday
C.S.S. Shenandoah, commanded by Lieutenant Waddell, steamed out of the hostile Bering Sea via the Amukta Passage in the Aleutian chain and set a southeasterly course across the commerce lanes of the Eastern Pacific. During Waddell's last week in the Bering Sea an idea had occurred to him and as the raider proceeded across the North Pacific he developed it into an audacious plan of action. The idea germinated from reading a San Francisco newspaper that he had obtained on 23 June from Susan Abigail. From the newspaper article he learned that U.S.S. Saginaw, under Commander Charles McDougal, was the only Union warship in San Francisco harbor and constituted the city's sole means of defense. Waddell had been second officer in her prior to the war and was thoroughly familiar with her capabilities and limitations. Moreover, the vessel's captain was "an old and familiar shipmate" whom Waddell remembered as being "fond of his ease." The bold Confederate planned to bring Shenandoah into San Francisco harbor under cover of darkness, ram Saginaw, and carry her by boarding. Beginning at daylight, the raider would subject the city to a prolonged bombardment, after which Waddell would send a negotiating party ashore to parlay for a sizable ransom."

Rear Admiral Stribling turned over command of the East Gulf Squadron to Rear Admiral Thatcher of the West Gulf Squadron. In accordance with Navy Department orders dated 9 June 1865, the two squadrons were joined to form the newly designated Gulf Squadron. Stribling proceeded to Boston on U.S.S. Powhatan and hauled down his flag on the 12th.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2015 3:17 pm 
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July 6, 1865 Thursday
U.S.S. Sacramento, commanded by Captain Henry Walke, intercepted steamer Beatrice, formerly C.S.S. Rappahannock, off the coast of Wales. She was enroute to Liverpool, England, from Calais, France, and was disarmed and under English colors. When intercepted, the former Confederate cruiser was steaming well within the three mile limit which Walke respected by refraining from either attacking or attempting to seize the vessel. Sacramento trailed the steamer through territorial waters until her arrival off Liverpool where Walke broke off the chase. Rappahannock had been purchased for the Confederacy by Commander Matthew F. Maury in the fall of 1863. However, she never went to sea as the French government detained the vessel in Calais where she had been taken to avoid seizure in England.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Mon Jul 06, 2015 6:25 pm 
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July 7, 1865 Friday
On a hot, oppressive midsummer day in Washington a large crowd gathered in the Arsenal grounds at the Old Penitentiary Building. Four graves were dug, four prisoners brought in, and four hanged. Lewis Payne, George A. Atzerodt, David Herold, and Mrs Mary E. Surratt were executed for their roles in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. Until the very last it was hoped by some that there would be presidential intervention in the case of Mrs Surratt, but it was not forthcoming. The four other convicted conspirators were taken to Fort Jefferson on Dry Tortugas off Key West, Florida. There, in 1867, Michael O’Laughlin died of yellow fever. Because of his role as a doctor in the epidemic, Samuel Mudd ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Mudd ) was pardoned in 1868, and in 1869 Edward Spangler ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Spangler ) and Samuel Arnold ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Ar ... onspirator) ) were also pardoned.

Secretary Welles ordered Rear Admiral Radford of the Atlantic Squadron to further reduce his command to a total of 10 vessels. Welles also ordered the further reduction of the Gulf Squadron to a total of 12 vessels.

Rear Admiral Thatcher reported to Secretary Welles that U.S.S. Sciota had been raised, repaired and sent to Pensacola for re-arming. This vessel had been sunk by a torpedo in Mobile Bay while conducting sweeping operations, 14 April.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2015 4:21 pm 
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July 11, 1865 Tuesday
Secretary Welles advised Rear Admiral S. P. Lee, commanding the Mississippi Squadron, that officers against whom no charges were pending could leave the service at once, with honorable discharges and receive a month's leave for each year of service.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day 1865
PostPosted: Sun Jul 12, 2015 3:22 pm 
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July 13, 1865 Thursday
William Marvin was named provisional governor of Florida by President Johnson.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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