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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 5:52 am 
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<blockquote id="quote"><font size="3" face="book antiqua" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by KWhitehead</i>
<br /><b>Jul 1861</b>

The dastardly Yankee’s seized most of West Virginia and all of Missouri whose turn coat inhabitants promptly went over to the Union. The few Rebel troops in Western Virginia are driven out. Kentucky is neutral so serves as a buffer for now. I quickly shift troops to New Orleans, Memphis and Northern Virginia to stop any immediate invasions. The coast is tougher. Some areas have sufficient population to generate militia to throw the enemy back if they land but there are many regions that don’t plus most need fortifications and troops that I don’t have. I do move forces to Norfolk and build a fort there.

This first turn forces me to face the first hard decision the CSA player has to make. What to do about my command situation. I have Gen. Cooper in Richmond as my Theatre Commander. He is relatively good but may drop dead at any time, drinking problem I think. Johnson and Beauregard are my two Army Commanders in Virginia. Neither are great nor up to Theatre Command. In the West I have A. Johnson. If I promote one to Theater Command then I will have to promote a mediocre general to Army Command. If I don’t fill the spots I hurt my Initiative chances as well as reduce the number of Political Points these commanders generate (you get each turn PP equal to the sum of your Commander’s political ratings). I decide to try to get by without the appointment.

I also decide to start some Raider production (this is separate from normal production so the AI doesn’t control it in this game). I plan to make a total of four ships over the coming months. This is an iffy call. It cost the South 31 supply to produce one. Over the long term they will cause 2-3 political points of damage to the North every turn but it is difficult to judge how much value you get for the investment. I compromised and built some but not a lot.

In other areas I am creating cavalry and calling up leaders and trying to get organized for the coming invasions.

The Union of course makes their first Draft. The Draft costs them 50 PP but it’s a must for them to raise their armies quickly. It will also give them more than twice my numbers very quickly. Before everyone points out the Union didn’t have a draft in 1861 be aware that it’s a simplification. In the game the cost of producing Militia changes with each year of the war. So declaring a Draft in 61 or 62 reduces the cost of Militia to 6 population points for two turns. This will be followed by four turns where it will cost the normal population points plus 3. In 1863 this cost changes to 12 and in 64 to 18. So the low cost in 61 and 62 reflect that these are really calls for volunteers not drafts. The normal population cost for militia changes each year. For the North it is 18 in 1861/62 which is why the calling of the Draft is so important. In later years it keeps going up to 24 in 63 and 30 in 64/65. This is why Black recruitment is so important to the Union later in the game.

The South on the other hand has no draft just the normal recruitment. Its numbers are 9 in 61, 6 in 62, 12 in 63 and finally 18 after. Considering the South’s smaller population pool you can see from 63 on the CSA losses the ability to make new units. What little they have will go to repairing damaged units.


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

The Confederacy does have a draft but it is built into the South's numbers. We had this discussion over on the Matrix board. The South instituted the draft before the Union.[:)]

Brig. Gen. Phil Driscoll
1st Brigade/1st Division/VCorps/AoP


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 6:04 am 
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Great to read. Downloaded my game on Sunday evening, going through the Videos...

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:30 pm 
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<b>Feb 1862</b>

The Yankees went on the offensive, mostly exploiting their being everywhere. Grant marches into Bowling Green and amphibious landings in New Bern and Pensacola. I am only partially able to respond.

New Bern is an easy one. Even though Beauregard hasn’t been able to reform his army on the East Coast New Bern is to near other fortified areas and Virginia. I easily pull in enough troops to win this one. Banks is driven back into the sea.

Pensacola again is an easy one too. Early hasn’t had time to leave so Hunter lands his Yankees into a region with a full division waiting for him. He is easily driven back.

Bowling Green is another story. Not a single brigade gets initiative to go help so the troops under Gen. Pillow are left to fight 77,000 Yankees with just 6,000 men. Unfortunately Pillow is an idiot and actually stands and fights instead of running losing most of his command.

As for my turn the fighting has gotten most of my men out of position so except for cavalry raids I most shuffle troops. A. Johnson moves most of his command to a central position to try place himself between the two armies advancing on Tennessee but his situation is still hopeless. Either Army can defeat his small force. I desperately need time to rebuild my armies so they can even stand a chance against these huge Yankee forces. The South needs a lot of luck on the next two turns.

Gen. Bragg after a short convalescence has returned to active duty giving me one offensive general in the west. Lee should be available next month. Hopefully the Union gives me a breathing space to reorganize my armies but I doubt it.


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 12:41 pm 
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<blockquote id="quote"><font size="3" face="book antiqua" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by laubster22</i>
<br />Great to read. Downloaded my game on Sunday evening, going through the Videos...

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General Jeff Laub
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http://www.geocities.com/laubster22/UnionHQ/
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Study them well particularly that first turn walk through. This games got a steep learning curve. Took me a few tries just to reproduce that walk through and at least playing the USA and CSA once against the AI on easy with Historic leaders to figure out enough to feel I could make an intelligent move in the game.

LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 2:25 pm 
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"Bowling Green is another story. Not a single brigade gets initiative to go help so the troops under Gen. Pillow are left to fight 77,000 Yankees with just 6,000 men. Unfortunately Pillow is an idiot and actually stands and fights instead of running losing most of his command."

Okay, who's gonna make a HPS scenario for this one? Sounds fairly balanced to me. [;)]

MajGen Al 'Ambushed' Amos

The Union Forever! Huzzah!


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:35 am 
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<blockquote id="quote"><font size="3" face="book antiqua" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Al Amos</i>
<br />"Bowling Green is another story. Not a single brigade gets initiative to go help so the troops under Gen. Pillow are left to fight 77,000 Yankees with just 6,000 men. Unfortunately Pillow is an idiot and actually stands and fights instead of running losing most of his command."

Okay, who's gonna make a HPS scenario for this one? Sounds fairly balanced to me. [;)]

MajGen Al 'Ambushed' Amos
The Union Forever! Huzzah!
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

Easy, just use the Corinth map and game. Have the Union enter along every road on all four edges of the map. Pillow with two brigades placed in Corinth. CSA wins if Pillow makes off the board, leader only required.[:D]

LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:40 am 
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<b>Mar 1862</b>

March is still winter but it’s a hot time in the border states. Gen. Collins seems to be probing for weaknesses in the Virginia front and makes an all out assault in Kentucky. I’ll give a detail description of the Humbolt assault since it’s the first full battle. I turned back all the attacks but it fixed my units in place so that I couldn’t make any significant shift of troops. This is quite important in Kentucky/Tennessee are because the Union has concentrated huge armies there. About 80,000 men in Paducah and maybe 100,000 in Bowling Green. I don’t know why he made the smaller attack out of Paducah this turn. One of the problems with winter offensives is you can seldom move some of your poorer commanders even if they have initiative.

The Virginia probes were all small attacks against different areas of the state. Attacks were made on Norfolk, New Kent (next to Fort Monroe), and Manassas but none were overpowering and I easily had enough men with initiative to move substantial forces into each area. In Manassas I sent Jackson in, giving the force there 27,000 men against 6,000. I wanted to make sure Jackson got some points to his promotion. In New Kent I sent Longstreet who brought the numbers up to about 17,000 against 7,000 under Tyler. Here I won handily but at great cost. Longstreet is wounded and out of action for a while.

The Norfolk fight was peculiar because it involve ships and heavy artillery. The numbers were much closer too. Smith was sent by Beauregard with 18,000 men against an invasion force of 19,000 under McDowell. But Norfolk has 4 heavy artillery units (in game terms this is 80 guns) against the Yankee’s who sent three Fleets. The Fleets attack first damaging some of my artillery but my force easily wipes McDowell. Then follows something different. My Heavy Guns execute an attack against the ships after the main battle sinking two of them.

Naval forces have some unique operations when engaged in land support operations. They can bombard during the movement phase to attempt to destroy the artillery in forts. They can support the infantry attack with a bombardment phase during battle. And if they are still in the adjacent waters at the end of the turn they are subject to a bombardment from shore batteries.

Anyway all these Virginia battles ended up minor victories for me. Minor victories don’t generate as many Political Points as Major so only a small gain here. They do give the leaders a chance to improve though. The unusual thing about minor battles is both the winner and the loser can improve leaders. In major battles losing is always bad for leaders I think.

Now for the big battle in Humbolt. Gen. A. Johnson reacts to this one with everything he can get hold of. Unfortunately he didn’t get initiative but most of his subordinates did. In Reaction phase all you need is sufficient movement points so some units could make it without initiative but I had a few who couldn’t. This is where cavalry scouting is important. Since I had scouted Paducah I had spotted all the Union forces there so I had a pretty good idea of how many were attacking. The USA forces consisted of 17 Infantry, 7 Militia, 10 Field Guns, 2 Heavy Guns, and 2 Cavalry. To counter this invasion I was able to move 18 Infantry, 5 Militia, 7 Field Guns, 2 Heavy Guns, and 3 Cavalry into the region. Cavalry scouting yields another dividend in that units spotted don’t fight as goods as unspotted units. This is to simulate surprise.

Here is where a lot of things get iffy. One problem is using Heavy Guns. If you lose they are usually lost in the retreat. The other is our forces are very much the same size. Each infantry unit has about 2,000 men and each artillery unit is equivalent to 20 guns. The Union probably also has some gunboats that don’t show up. The good thing for me is most of my units are not spotted and its winter. Unspotted units get a bonus. Also the Union movement cost more and hopefully it is poorly commanded, Gen. Lyon being in overall command. In battles your troops are fed in slowly based on their Leader’s ability and how far they moved to get there. I hope I have the edge there.

The battle starts slowly with only about 6,000 on each side fighting and then begins building as more Leaders arrive with their troops. At its height the following forces are involved:

USA 52,400 men and 240 guns
CSA 53,800 men and 180 guns

But old Albert is a much better general than Lyon. He drives the Yankees off with heavy losses:

USA loses: 13,160 men and 30 guns
CSA loses: 7,660 men and 10 guns

And here is where the problem with heavy guns as well as the commande’rs ability to retreat come in. The final USA loses are 13,460 men and 60 guns. Your artillery takes a beating when you lose especially if you have heavy artillery with you.

The other big plus for winning a Major Victory is many of your officers get their command points improved and points to promotion. The important ones for me are Bragg to 16 and A. Johnston to 18 since I plan to make major changes to my command structure this turn. I will cover my leader selection in a separate post.

The down side of all this is my troops are now shifted out of place for what will come on the first summer turn of April. Most have used up their movement and can’t be shifted back to support positions for the coming attacks. All I can hope for is bad Union initiative to give me another turn to reorganize.


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:42 am 
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<b>Leader Promotions</b>

In March R. E. Lee became available and it was time for me to fix my fractured command structure so I thought I would make a separate write up on it so people could see some of what goes into Commanders and Leaders in the game. Leaders have a lot of attributes that affect different parts of the game depending on their role in it. Here are some of the most important one grouped by type:

Rank: Which is of course how high level a General they are. Most are 1-4 star generals but a few leaders start off colonels. In the game Rank determines who can be promoted to command Armies and Theaters. You must be three or four start or two star with more than 10 command points. Rank is also used as part of the initiative roll for TC (Theater Commanders) so is important to that assignment.

Command Points: This is the number that determines how many units can be under the Leader. For the TC it also is used in the Initiative roll.

Attack and Defense Ratings: Every Leader has a number 1-4 assigned to these. They are added to the combat values of troops below them for offensive and defensive situations. But most importantly the Attack rating is used in determining if a Leader and in particular the AC (Army Commander) has initiative.

Special Ability Ratings: Every Leader has a number 1-4 assigned to his ability to command different types of troops (infantry, artillery, cavalry, and naval). These numbers are added to the combat values of troops assigned to them and for AC are passed down to troops they activate. And almost as important the number is added to the movement factor of the unit type to determine the groups overall number of MP’s.

Political Rating and Administrative Rating: These two are the support ratings of the Leaders. Political is used in a number of functions but for TC’s and AC’s is added to the sides total Political Points for the month. The Administrative Rating is used to reduce the cost of building fortifications but for the TC is also used to determine initiative.

Training Ratings: Are used to help turn militia or mounted cavalry into trained infantry and cavalry.

Army Modifier: And last but not least is the army modifier which is 0 through -2. It is used to reduce the attack and defense ratings of the Leader if he is appointed to Army Command. Since this is so critical to an AC a leader having a negative number here is out of the running.

First the TC, Theatre Commander, whose main duty is to generate initiative bonuses to the two AC’s under them. The TC gets initiative based off of Rank, Administrative and Command ratings. Here Lee has trumps across the board but you hate to waste a general with a 4 Attack Rating on a desk job. So I will keep Cooper as the TC in the East. He has a 4 star rank, 4 admin, and a slightly low 16 command but not bad and to dismiss him would cost me political points. Only really serious negative for him is a 2 Political Rating so he doesn’t give me much in PP each month.

My second TC for the West is a much tougher choice. I have only four generals with sufficient rank for the position (J. Johnston, A. Johnston, Beauregard, and Lee). Lee it isn’t going to be and of the other three each has problems. Albert has the best political rating but also the best Attack rating so I would rather have him for an AC. Beauregard is only a three star general so the job goes to Joe Johnson.

For AC’s I have more choices since two star generals are allowed as long as they have Command Points above 10. This gives me a choice of Beauregard (already an AC), A. Johnston (also an AC), Lee, Van Dorn, Jackson, Polk, and Bragg. Jackson and Polk are out of the running because they have a -1 Army Modifier which means they will be much less effective as an AC than as Leaders. Lee of course is a sure in for the third AC. That leaves who is fourth since it will cost me PP to dismiss any existing AC’s. Bragg is the winner bringing only a two star rank to the job but a 4 Political Rating and a 3 Attack Rating.

So here’s my team going into the summer of 1862:

Gen. Cooper TC in East
Gen. J. Johnston TC in West
Supported by the following AC’s:
Gen. R. Lee
Gen. A. Johnston
Gen. P. Beauregard
Gen. B. Bragg

And no, Bragg doesn’t cause all his subordinate’s ratings to decrease by one.[:D][:D][:D]


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:34 am 
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<blockquote id="quote"><font size="3" face="book antiqua" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote">Study them well particularly that first turn walk through. This games got a steep learning curve. Took me a few tries just to reproduce that walk through and at least playing the USA and CSA once against the AI on easy with Historic leaders to figure out enough to feel I could make an intelligent move in the game.

LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

That's the tough part - I'm a jump first, ask questions second kind of person![:D] Trying to be patient. Didn't get any time last night to continue my studies...

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General Jeff Laub
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 11:07 am 
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The Yankee armies are still unable to make a lodgement on fortress CSA. The blockade is having some effect but could be better.

Kentucky is still unowned by either side but we both have major forces there or near the Tennessee border. The rebs are engaging in all kinds of Cavalry raids and the northern democratic newspapers are having a field day ridiculing the Lincoln administration. The countryside around Baltimore is being ravaged by these Rebels and the Union army does not have sufficiently trained cavalry in any great numbers to stop them as yet.

Political points for Union are still under 1000, which is not good. You want to have 1000 points just in case you win a major battle and then can emancipate the slaves.

I'm still finding it nearly impossible to capture New Orleans via water and utilizing the navy. In a practice AI game I'm trying to learn the secret. It must be a combination of naval movement, the leader chosen and the terrain that is preventing me landing there. I still have to work that one out.

Again I say, this is a great game and is easily becoming one of my favourite strategic games.

Bg. General Gilbert Collins
Army of Alabama
III/I/2nd Brigade


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 1:29 pm 
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<b>Apr 1862</b>

Must have got lucky or to be more exact the Yankees got unlucky. Most of the offensive this turn were minor operations. The large Yankee army in Bowling Green moved into my weakly held Tennessee region of Clarksville easily overrunning it. They also sent a side force to take Glasglow, Kentucky.

The only offensives I attempt to resist was another landing in Elizabeth City below Norfolk. There I was able to send Early, Smith and Alexander’s artillery to support dealing McDowell another defeat.

For the first time the Union attempted a Naval only assault against the Mississippi forts. Admiral Farragut easily dispatched the Confederate Navy then bombarded my forts. My heavy artillery sank one ship then in the Shore Bombardment counterattack sent another two to Davy Jones. Unfortunately the Union fleet was still occupying the mouth of the Mississippi at the end of the turn shutting down all the Mississippi ports. This dropped my import supplies to 90 from 120. This is going to hurt because my ability to supply my armies is already deteriorating rapidly.

Otherwise I spend the turn trying to reorganize my army except for a minor attack against Franklin by Ewell to see if I can distract the Union. The big decision was whether to send Lee West. Lee would give the Western armies a much needed leadership advantage but at the cost of risking Virginia. I have already decided to give up Manassas without a fight and probably Winchester as well but I still need a AC there that can fight against hopeless odds.

Which brings us to Strategic Strategy. There is a reason during the Civil War the Southern generals withdrew behind the Rivers. It draws the Union away from their bases and places the CSA armies in positions from which to react to any move. A. Johnston withdrew below the Tennessee River because it is almost impossible to defend the areas above against an enemy with river movement. Tennessee is cut into four sections by first the southward Tennessee River which then runs east and back up to the north cutting Tennessee into a Western, Central and Eastern sections. And flowing across the top of Tennessee the Cumberland River cuts the northern section off. This is why I didn’t attempt to hold Clarksville above the Cumberland. I am not sure I can defend Nashville in the Center area without cutting myself off from supporting Memphis. I’ll know more once I see how far the reaction movement reaches from holding a central position between Nashville and Memphis.


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 2:04 am 
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September 1862 - A crisis in the Union is at hand!

Jefferson Davis, alarmed at the affairs in Kentucky orders Robert E. Lee west to take command of confederate forces in Northern Mississippi. Lee, ever the bold commander marches north and engages Nathaniel Lyon's army and drives him out of Paducah Kentucky. Confederate forces are once more on the Ohio river.

Grant, ever on the offensive defeats the Rebel army defending Nashville, but Lee's victory at Paducah has undermined Kentucky going over to the Union.

On other fronts the news is bad. Gen. Beauregard drives the Union army out of Jacksonville Florida and Gen. Banks pulls a 'Cornwallis' by getting himself captured.

Lincoln is forced to call another draft of soldiers and the opposition press is having a field day. The Lincoln administrations popularity drops by 50.

The Union commanders demoralized by events all over the nation refuse to move their commands. The Union army is in a rut. In an attempt to salvage the situation the Union Navy has launched a supreme effort at the mouth of the Mississippi. Will they be successful? The nation feverishly looks on.



Bg. General Gilbert Collins
Army of Alabama
III/I/2nd Brigade


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:33 am 
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<b>May 1862</b>

The Yankees come swarming south. Two large armies move from Paducah to Humbolt and another from D.C. to Manassas. My little side expedition into W.Va. by Ewell captured Franklin without trouble but I am not sure the Union noticed. A fleet of six gunboats came up the river attacking Nashville’s artillery knocking out two units.

The Battle of Manassas with Lee versus McClellan was a sure thing. Lee easily concentrated enough force to turn him back with heavy losses. Some 27,000 Yankees lost in the attempt at the cost of only 6,000 Rebs. Unfortunately the great victory was offset by the loss of Jackson to a serious wound.

The Battle for Humbolt though reflects the problems the Western armies have. Poor leadership so many troops not activated to respond to the invasion and poor transportation so those that were could reach. The river system is killing me. I managed to mass enough infantry to match the Union but most of my artillery couldn’t make it. The result being a defeat and putting the Union in easy reach of Memphis. With their other army next to Nashville with the rivers separating them and my forces even more badly scattered by the defeat, next turn is going to be worse in the West.

I would like to transfer Lee to the Western theater but to do it I have to have a pause in these constant battles so I can make the move and reorganize my armies. And, to make things worse I am almost out of supplies. The only ray of hope here is the Union found the forts at the mouth of the Mississippi to hot to handle and withdrew thus restoring supplies to the Mississippi ports.


LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 5:54 am 
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<blockquote id="quote"><font size="3" face="book antiqua" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by gcollins</i>
<br />September 1862 - A crisis in the Union is at hand!

The Union commanders demoralized by events all over the nation refuse to move their commands. The Union army is in a rut. In an attempt to salvage the situation the Union Navy has launched a supreme effort at the mouth of the Mississippi. Will they be successful? The nation feverishly looks on.

<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

And, they watch their ships slowly sink to the bottom of the Mississippi.[:D]

LG. Kennon Whitehead
Chatham Grays
1/1/III AoM (CSA)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2008 10:45 am 
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NEWS FLASH - THE WASHINGTON DAILY INTELLIGENCER

The radical newspapers are openly attacking the Lincoln administration now that the great naval attack at Ft. St. Phillipe has been repulsed.

Halleck in a desperate move to try and bolster the government has sent a second expedition to the fort under Gen. McDowell. Lincoln was quoted as saying "if the expedition fails I feel the water is out of the tub".

Northern commanders continue in their lethargy and now openly refuse to move, claiming the campaigning season is over.

Will some commander come forward to save the Union!

Seriously, I am finding the naval/bombardment rules a little confusing. I amassed a gigantic fleet to bombard Fort St. Phillipe to support the infantry assault. But when I attempted to bombard I got a message to the effect "cannot bombard while friendly forces present". So I'm not sure what I'm supposed to do there.

Bg. General Gilbert Collins
Army of Alabama
III/I/2nd Brigade


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