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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 10:40 pm 
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May 9, 1861 Thursday
President Davis signed a bill, approved by the Confederate Congress May 7, which authorized the President to accept into volunteer service such forces as he might deem expedient for the duration of the war. Confederate Secretary of the Navy Mallory, ordered Commander James D. Bulloch, CSN, to England to purchase ships, guns, and ammunition. In his instructions he said: ". . . provide as one of the conditions of payment for the delivery of the vessels under the British flag at one of our Southern ports, and, secondly, that the bonds of the Confederacy be taken in whole or in part payment. The class of vessel desired for immediate use is that which offers the greatest chances of success against the enemy's commerce . . . as side-wheel steamers can not be made general cruisers, and as from the enemy's force before our forts, our ships must be enabled to keep the sea, and to make extended cruises, propellers fast under both steam and canvas suggest themselves to us with special favor. Large ships are unnecessary for this service; our policy demands that they shall be no larger than may be sufficient to combine the requisite speed and power, a battery of one or two heavy pivot guns and two or more broadside guns, being sufficient against commerce. By getting small ships we can afford 2 greater number, an important consideration. The character of the coasts and harbors indicate attention to the draft of water of our vessels. Speed in a propeller and the protection of her machinery can not be obtained upon a very light draft, but they should draw as little water as may be compatible with their efficiency otherwise." This was a mission ably carried out. The Missouri Volunteer State Militia at Camp Jackson has its eyes set on the St Louis Arsenal http://www.gather.com/viewArticle.actio ... 4979206767 .

A White House party, including President Lincoln, spends the afternoon at the Navy Yard. They view dress parade of 71st New York Regiment and attend a band concert. They board the steamer U.S.S. Pensacola and watch target practice by an 11-inch Dahlgren gun. In the evening, President Lincoln and his wife, Mary, host a reception for "commissioned officers, and their families, of the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps and the Volunteer Militia." Major Robert Anderson, whose forces strove to repel the Confederate attack on Ft. Sumter, arrives unnoticed. A newspaper reports, "The President . . . hastened in quest of the Major, and leading him forward placed him by his side." Lincoln's sons Willie and Tad "especially" admire Anderson. While Federal troops kept coming into Washington, pro-Confederate units left Maryland for Virginia. U.S.S. Constitution and U.S. steamer Baltic arrived at Newport, R.I., with officers and midshipmen from the U.S. Naval Academy to set up the Academy dispossessed from Annapolis for the duration. Troops from abandoned Fort Cobb in the Indian Territory joined the column of Col. William Emory marching through the territory to Kansas.

A good summation of events leading up to and through 1861 from the U.S. Army Office of the Chief of Military History is located at http://www.history.army.mil/books/amh/AMH-09.htm .

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2011 11:31 pm 
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May 10, 1861 Friday
St Louis exploded into action. Troops marched, shots were fired, and people fell. The pro-Union elements in the city, including the vocal German group, were organized under Capt. Nathaniel Lyon, temporarily commanding the arsenal, and Francis Preston Blair, Jr., politician and member of the well-known Blair family. In addition to a few regulars, the unionists had organized some political marching clubs into Home Guards. The State Militia, on the other hand, was largely pro-secessionist or at least opposed to supporting the Union war effort. Gov. Claiborne Jackson had made this abundantly clear. On May 6 the militia had gathered at Camp Jackson in Lindell’s Grove in the western part of the city under command of Gen. D.M. Frost, former army officer turned politician. The camp had definite Southern overtones, with streets unofficially reported to be named “Davis Avenue” and for Beauregard and other Confederates. Surplus arms from the arsenal had been sent into Illinois, but the unionists feared that the militia at Camp Jackson, named for the governor, would attack the arsenal; therefore the camp must be taken. The story is that on May 8 Lyon, dressed as an elderly woman, drove through the camp as a spy, but this is highly dubious, for all the information needed was readily available. Late on May 8 a boat had brought boxes marked “marble” to the city. They turned out to be loaded with mortars and guns for the secessionists. Frost’s militia camp was set to disband May 11, and he denied any covert intentions. Lyon, urged on by Blair, decided to take the camp because of their “unscrupulous conduct, and their evident design … .”

Violent, sometimes almost wild in his patriotism, Lyon led possibly 7,000 men against the roughly 700 at Camp Jackson. Frost had neither attacked the arsenal nor retreated. Surrounded, he surrendered without a shot. During the march back to the arsenal, the prisoners were guarded by the Germans and regulars. Excitement had been extreme in the city for days, with cries of “Hessians” against the Germans, and equally strong anti-Southern feelings expressed. A crowd of the curious and agitated viewed the march, including one William T. Sherman and his son, and of course it happened; someone pushed or shoved, a shot or two rang out, and then more and more with the unionists firing on the crowd. Accounts are many, facts few. When it was over some 28 or 29 people were dead or mortally wounded, including, reportedly, a child in arms. Mobs stormed through the streets of St Louis that night; all saloons were closed. A strange sort of war; the “battle” of St Louis.

Elsewhere, the Maryland legislature passed a resolution imploring President Lincoln to cease prosecuting the war against the South; authorities in Washington still almost hourly expected fighting in Maryland. President Lincoln continued to be involved with the business of appointments, both civil and military, and poses for photographs in M. B. Brady's studio. The President directs commander of U.S. forces on Florida coast to suspend writ of habeas corpus, "if he shall find it necessary." Off Charleston U.S.S. Niagara began a blockade patrol. In Montgomery President Davis signed an act of Congress calling for purchase abroad of 6 warships, arms, and stores. Sec. of the Navy Mallory urged the building of ironclads because the obvious inequality of the Confederate Navy would have to be offset by quality, strength, and invulnerability. The Confederate government in Montgomery placed Virginia Maj. Gen. Robert E. Lee in command of Confederate troops in Virginia.

The Protestant Episcopal Diocese of Alabama announced its withdrawal from the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. A peculiar weapon known as the Winans steam gun was captured by Federals while being sent South from Baltimore.

President Lincoln writes to Rhode Island Governor William Sprague and explains why he will not appoint Sprague's choice to a postmaster position. Lincoln writes, "[A] different man . . . is recommended by both the Senators, and both the old Representatives of the State, and also by one of the new Representatives. In these cases the Executive is obliged to be greatly dependent upon members of Congress; and while, under peculiar circumstances, a single member or two, may be occasionally over-ruled, I believe as strong a combination as the present never has been. I therefore beg you to be assured that if I follow the rule in this case, as it appears to me I must, it will be with pain and not with pleasure, that you are not obliged."

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2011 12:02 am 
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May 11, 1861 Saturday
The rampant crowds in St Louis continued to mill in the streets. At the northwest corner of Fifth and Walton, the 5th Reserve Regiment tangled with the crowd and again firing broke out. Six or seven more persons died in the fray. William S. Harney arrived back in the city to resume his Federal command, much disturbed by Lyon’s action. Slowly people became calmer, but the scars remained. Much discussion ensued; some felt St Louis had been held for the Union, others felt the whole affair wrong. At any rate, with or without the Camp Jackson affair, St Louis did remain Union and the secessionist voices gradually quieted.

At San Francisco business was suspended, flags waved, and people crowded the streets for a patriotic pro-Union demonstration complete with procession and speeches. But at the same time there were strong pockets of pro-secessionists in California, along with others who favored neutrality or even an independent Republic of the Pacific. Likewise a large Union meeting occurred at Wheeling, western Va.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2011 9:46 pm 
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May 12, 1861 Sunday
In St Louis Gen. Harney, now back in Federal command, issued a proclamation saying the public peace must be preserved and the laws obeyed.

There were reported attempts to damage railroads and bridges near Frederick and Baltimore, Md.

U.S.S. Niagara, commanded by Captain McKean, captured blockade runner General Parkhill, enroute from Liverpool to Charleston.

George Scott, the first contraband slave at Fort Monroe, Virginia, becomes a scout in the Union army. His information aids in the battle of Big Bethel, the first major land conflict of the war (see June 10, 1861).

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1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 11:47 pm 
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May 13, 1861 Monday
Without permission from Army Headquarters, Brig. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler moved troops from Relay Station, Md., into Baltimore and took possession of Federal Hill. Butler claimed he had reports of a riot in the city. He added that he found several manufactories of arms, supplies, and munitions meant for the “rebels.” Generally the move met with approval at the North, and probably did help keep down pro-Confederate activity, while at the same time rousing considerable resentment.

Queen Victoria officially issued a proclamation declaring Britain’s determination to maintain a strict neutrality between contending parties in America, and to accord to both sides the rights of belligerents. British citizens were warned against assisting either side. U.S. Minister to Britain Charles Francis Adams arrived in London in the evening to learn the news. Adams had been instructed to try to prevent recognition of the South as a belligerent.

The Southern Baptist Convention meeting at Savannah tendered to the Confederacy their confidence and trust. The Virginia Union Convention assembled in Wheeling, western Va. Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan assumed command of the Department of the Ohio for the Federals.

Brigadier General Ben McCulloch, CSA, is assigned command in the Indian Territory.

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Gen Ned Simms
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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 11:38 pm 
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May 14, 1861 Tuesday
In one of the strange anomalies of war, the Confederates had allowed the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad at Harper’s Ferry to continue operating on the main line between Washington and the West. This was due to an unwillingness to alienate the people of Maryland. T.J. Jackson, however, determined to obtain some much needed rolling stock for the South. Therefore he ruled that the coal trains could not move at night and then, during the morning operations, bagged a large number of the trains, sending many of the locomotives to Winchester and Strasburg, Va.

In Baltimore Gen. Butler was extending his rule of the city, seizing suspected arms and persons, including Ross Winans, noted inventor of the steam gun. At Hampton Roads the U.S.S. Minnesota, Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham, captured schooners Mary Willis, Delaware Farmer, and Emily Ann laden with tobacco for Baltimore. Argo, bound for Bremen from Richmond, was captured on the same date.. President Lincoln wrote Robert Anderson, now in Western command, that he should help pro-Union men in Kentucky receive arms from Cincinnati, despite the neutrality of Kentucky. Gen. Harney in St Louis issued another proclamation maintaining that citizens should disregard the bill passed by the legislature raising pro-secessionist state troops. In Montgomery the Confederate Congress requested that President Davis declare a day of fasting and prayer. Gov. Thomas H. Hicks of Maryland called for four regiments to protect Maryland or the capital of the United States.

The following military appointments were made: Robert Edward Lee, CSA, to Brigadier General; John Charles Frémont, USA, to Major General; Irvin McDowell, USA, to Brigadier General; Joseph King Fenno Mansfield, USA, to Brigadier General; Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, USA, to Brigadier General; and Erastus Barnard Tyler, USA, to Brigadier General.

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Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 9:38 pm 
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May 15, 1861 Wednesday
The Confederates named Brig Gen Joseph E. Johnston to command troops near Harper’s Ferry now under T.J. Jackson. Off New Orleans the Confederate privateer Calhoun captured the bark Ocean Eagle from Rockland, Me. Nathaniel Lyon in St Louis sent the 5th Missouri Infantry out to Potosi, Mo., in Washington County to aid pro-Union citizens. Federal Brig Gen George Cadwalader was named to replace Brig Gen Butler in command of the Department of Annapolis, including Baltimore. Gen. Butler confers with President and gets a commission as major general. Butler was sent to command Fort Monroe, the extremely vital Federal base in Virginia at Hampton Roads. Robert Anderson and George Archibald McCall were promoted to USA Brigadier General.

Secretary of the Navy Welles appointed Lieutenant Thomas M. Brasher to command U.S.S. Bainbridge and ordered him to proceed to Aspinwall, New Granada (Panama), to protect California steamers against ,"vessels sailing under pretended Letters of Marque issued by the insurrectionary States." California steamers transported large quantities of gold from Aspinwall to New York. Confederate ships were constantly on the alert for these vessels as the blockade tightened and the need for specie became increasingly desperate.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2011 5:59 pm 
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This is great stuff...I can't wait until the movie.... :lol:

Actually, this early termoil and the incredible isolation of washington at this time would be a great thriller!

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1st Div, XV Corps
Army of the Tennessee


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sun May 15, 2011 8:35 pm 
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May 16, 1861 Thursday
Tennessee was officially admitted to the Confederacy by Congress at Montgomery. A Kentucky legislative committee on Federal relations proposed that the state remain neutral. The Confederate Congress authorizes the recruiting of 400,000 men. Com. John Rodgers was ordered to set up Federal naval command on the rivers of the West under Gen Fremont’s command. The importance of controlling the Mississippi and its tributaries which pierced the interior in every direction was recognized immediately by the U.S. Government. This control was not only militarily strategic but was a vital factor in keeping the northwestern states in the Union. Under Rodgers, three river steamers were purchased at Cincinnati. Rodgers, overcoming no little difficulty in obtaining and training crews, getting guns and other equipment, converted the steamers to gunboats Tyler, Lexington, and Conestoga. These three gunboats, as stated by Alfred Thayer Mahan, were of inestimable service "'in keeping alive the attachment to the Union where it existed."

The following military appointments were made: Samuel Cooper, CSA, to General; John Adams Dix, USA, to Major General; and William Starke Rosecrans, USA, to Brigadier General.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 7:24 pm 
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May 17, 1861 Friday
President Davis signed a bill authorizing a loan to the Confederacy of $50,000,000 and the issuance of treasury notes. The President also signed a bill admitting North Carolina to the Confederacy contingent upon approval of the ordinance of secession and ratification of the Constitution. John T. Pickett was named Special Agent of the Confederate States to Mexico. The California legislature pledged the state’s support to the Federal government. Chief John Ross issued a proclamation of neutrality for the Cherokees in the Indian Territory. U.S.S. Minnesota, commanded by Flag Officer Stringham, captured bark Star en route from Richmond to Bremen.

The following military appointments to Brigadier General were made by the USA: Don Carlos Buell, James Cooper, Darius Nash Couch, Jacob Dolson Cox, Samuel Ryan Curtis, William Buel Franklin, Ulysses Simpson Grant, Charles Smith Hamilton, Samuel Peter Heintzelman, Joseph Hooker, Philip Kearny, Benjamin Franklin Kelley, Erasmus Darwin Keyes, Rufus King, Frederick West Lander, Nathaniel Lyon, John Alexander McClernand, William Reading Montgomery, John Walcott Phelps, John Pope, Andrew Porter, Fitz John Porter, Benjamin Mayberry Prentiss, Joseph Jones Reynolds, Robert Cumming Schenck, Thomas West Sherman, William Tecumseh Sherman, Franz Sigel, Charles Pomeroy Stone, and Alpheus Starkey Williams.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2011 8:10 pm 
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May 18, 1861 Saturday
Arkansas was officially admitted to the Confederacy with her congressmen taking their seats at Montgomery. Confederate schooner Savannah, Captain Thomas H. Baker, was commissioned by President Davis as "a private armed vessel in the service of the Confederate States on the high seas against the United States of America, their ships, vessels, goods, and effects, and those of their citizens during the pendency of the war now existing between the said Confederate States and the said United States." At Sewell’s Point near Norfolk, Va., two Federal vessels briefly engaged a Confederate battery. President Lincoln wrote Missouri political leader Francis P. Blair, Jr., that Blair should withhold the discretionary order sent him the day before to remove Gen Harney from St Louis command. Harney had been relieved April 21 and restored May 8 and had gone back to St Louis. Blair was watching Harney closely, feeling he was too tolerant of the pro-Confederate elements in St Louis and Missouri. Delegations both pro- and anti-Harney had called on Lincoln. President Lincoln inspects banks of Potomac, crosses Chain Bridge, visits Great Falls, Va., and twice passes pickets in Virginia without being recognized. Sec. Seward and President inspect ordnance office at Navy Yard.

The mouth of the Rappahannock River was blockaded, completing the increasingly effective blockade of Virginia.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 11:21 pm 
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May 19, 1861 Sunday
Confederate garrisons at Harper’s Ferry were being reinforced by troops from the deep South as the position was strengthened. Captures by U.S. naval vessels of Confederate shipping slowly by steadily increased. Two Federal ships again dueled with the Confederate battery at Sewell’s Point, Va in Hampton roads. C.S.S. Lady Davis, Lieutenant Thomas P. Pelot, captured American ship A. B. Thompson off Charleston S.C. President Lincoln attends church service and then Sec. Seward, Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs, and Lincoln drive to Great Falls, Va., returning about dark.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 6:30 pm 
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May 20, 1861 Monday
In convention assembled at Raleigh, delegates voted unanimously for secession of North Carolina. At the same time the delegates ratified the Confederate Constitution, but defeated a move to submit the Constitution to popular vote. Thus the eleventh and last full state had left the Union; Kentucky and Missouri were to have both Confederate and Union governments. Gov Beriah Magoffin of Kentucky issued a proclamation of neutrality. He forbade “any movement upon Kentucky soil” or occupation by either government and forbade citizens to make hostile demonstrations. The Provisional Congress of the Confederacy voted to move the capital of the nation from Montgomery, Ala to Richmond, Va, a move calculated to ensure the support of Virginia. William Wing Loring, CSA, was appointed to Brigadier General. U.S.S. Crusader, commanded by Lieutenant T. A. Craven, captured Neptune near Fort Taylor, Florida.

In midafternoon U.S. marshals throughout the North descended upon telegraph offices and confiscated dispatches for the past year. The action was designed to uncover evidence against pro-secessionists and Confederate agents.

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Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2011 5:55 pm 
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May 21, 1861 Tuesday
In Missouri Gen Sterling Price, representing the state and the pro-secessionists, and Gen Harney for the United States signed a proclamation in which they agreed that Price was to direct the power of the state officers to maintain order, and that Harney would not bring in the Federal Army if order were maintained. This was interpreted by Blair and Lyon as being a virtual surrender of the state.

In Washington President Lincoln sent a dispatch, signed and in part composed by Sec of State Seward, to British minister Charles Francis Adams, instructing him to desist from contact with the British government as long as it continued intercourse with “the domestic enemies of this county.” At Washington, D. C.'s Navy yard, President Lincoln attends the funeral of Colonel Abram S. Vosburgh, of New York's 71st Regiment. Vosburgh died after a brief illness, and a newspaper reports, "He leaves a wife and two children, both boys, one four years and the other eight months old. . . . [Vosburgh] was exceedingly popular with his regiment." After the services, Lincoln and members of the cabinet ride in a procession to the railroad depot, where Vosburgh's remains will be transported back to his home state.

On the last day of the second session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy President Davis announced that he had signed a bill to make the Provisional Constitution permanent. Meeting for the last time in Montgomery, Congress still debated moving the headquarters of the Confederacy. Some members favored other places or advocated Montgomery over Richmond. But the majority believed that military and psychological advantages gave the edge to the Virginia city. President Davis also signed one bill outlawing the payment by Southerners of money due Northern merchants, and approved another prohibiting cotton trade except through Confederate ports.

John A. Stevenson of New Orleans discussed with Secretary of the Navy Mallory a "plan by which the enemy's blockading navy might be driven from our coasts," and wrote President Davis, "We have no time, place, or means, to build an effective navy. Our ports are, or soon will be, all blockaded. On land we do not fear Lincoln, but what shall we do to cripple him at sea? In this emergency, and seeing that he is arming many poorly adapted vessels, I have two months past been entirely engaged in perfecting plans by which I could so alter and adapt some of our heavy and powerful tow-boats on the Mississippi as to make them comparatively safe against the heaviest guns afloat, and by preparing their bow in a peculiar manner, as my plans and model will show, render them capable of sinking by collision the heaviest vessels ever built . . .

The oldest active Federal warship, U.S.S. Constellation, veteran of the War of 1812, captured a slave ship off the mouth of the Congo. U.S.S. Pocahontas, Commander John P. Gillis, seized steamboat James Guy off Machodoc Creek, Virginia.

Colonel John B. Magruder, Provisional Army of Virginia, is assigned command at Yorktown, Virginia. Brigadier General Milledge Luke Bonham, CSA, is assigned command on the "Alexandria Line", Virginia.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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 Post subject: Re: The American Civil War, Day by Day
PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 8:25 pm 
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May 22, 1861 Wednesday
Gen Benjamin F. Butler arrived to take command at strategic Fort Monroe, Va. It was reported that the market in Europe for Confederate securities was weak.

Charles Clark, CSA, and David Emanuel Twiggs, CSA, were appointed to Brigadier General.

_________________
Gen Ned Simms
1/1/XIV Corps/AotC
Blood 'n Guts hisself, a land lovin' pirate. Show me some arty tubes and we'll charge 'em.
VMI Class of '00


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